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Wake respirometry allows breath-by-breath assessment of ventilation and CO<sub>2</sub> production in unrestrained animals

Wake respirometry allows breath-by-breath assessment of ventilation and CO2 production in unrestrained animals

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ROSE, Kayleigh A. R., Rory P. WILSON, Claudia RAMENDA, Hermina ROBOTKA, Martin WIKELSKI, Emily L. C. SHEPARD, 2022. Wake respirometry allows breath-by-breath assessment of ventilation and CO2 production in unrestrained animals. In: iScience. Elsevier. 25(9), 104878. eISSN 2589-0042. Available under: doi: 10.1016/j.isci.2022.104878

@article{Rose2022-09-16respi-59076, title={Wake respirometry allows breath-by-breath assessment of ventilation and CO2 production in unrestrained animals}, year={2022}, doi={10.1016/j.isci.2022.104878}, number={9}, volume={25}, journal={iScience}, author={Rose, Kayleigh A. R. and Wilson, Rory P. and Ramenda, Claudia and Robotka, Hermina and Wikelski, Martin and Shepard, Emily L. C.}, note={Article Number: 104878} }

Ramenda, Claudia Robotka, Hermina Attribution 4.0 International Shepard, Emily L. C. Wilson, Rory P. eng 2022-11-08T15:01:36Z 2022-11-08T15:01:36Z Wikelski, Martin Shepard, Emily L. C. Wake respirometry allows breath-by-breath assessment of ventilation and CO<sub>2</sub> production in unrestrained animals Quantifying stress and energetic responses in animals are major challenges, as existing methods lack temporal resolution and elevate animal stress. We propose "wake respirometry," a new method of quantifying fine-scale changes in CO<sub>2</sub> production in unrestrained animals, using a nondispersive infrared CO<sub>2</sub> sensor positioned downwind of the animal, i.e., in its wake. We parameterize the dispersion of CO<sub>2</sub> in wakes using known CO<sub>2</sub> flow rates and wind speeds. Tests with three bird species in a wind tunnel demonstrated that the system can resolve breath-by-breath changes in CO<sub>2</sub> concentration, with clear exhalation signatures increasing in period and integral with body size. Changes in physiological state were detectable following handling, flight, and exposure to a perceived threat. We discuss the potential of wake respirometry to quantify stress and respiratory patterns in wild animals and provide suggestions for estimating behavior-specific metabolic rates via full integration of CO<sub>2</sub> production across the wake. 2022-09-16 Wilson, Rory P. Wikelski, Martin Rose, Kayleigh A. R. Robotka, Hermina Rose, Kayleigh A. R. Ramenda, Claudia

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