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Predicting chromosome damage in astronauts participating in international space station missions

Predicting chromosome damage in astronauts participating in international space station missions

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FEIVESON, Alan, Kerry GEORGE, Mark SHAVERS, Maria MORENO-VILLANUEVA, Ye ZHANG, Adriana BABIAK-VAZQUEZ, Brian CRUCIAN, Edward SEMONES, Honglu WU, 2021. Predicting chromosome damage in astronauts participating in international space station missions. In: Scientific reports. Nature. 11, 5293. eISSN 2045-2322. Available under: doi: 10.1038/s41598-021-84242-5

@article{Feiveson2021-03-05Predi-53218, title={Predicting chromosome damage in astronauts participating in international space station missions}, year={2021}, doi={10.1038/s41598-021-84242-5}, volume={11}, journal={Scientific reports}, author={Feiveson, Alan and George, Kerry and Shavers, Mark and Moreno-Villanueva, Maria and Zhang, Ye and Babiak-Vazquez, Adriana and Crucian, Brian and Semones, Edward and Wu, Honglu}, note={Article Number: 5293} }

Babiak-Vazquez, Adriana Babiak-Vazquez, Adriana Crucian, Brian Feiveson, Alan Feiveson, Alan Moreno-Villanueva, Maria Space radiation consists of energetic protons and other heavier ions. During the International Space Station program, chromosome aberrations in lymphocytes of astronauts have been analyzed to estimate received biological doses of space radiation. More specifically, pre-flight blood samples were exposed ex vivo to varying doses of gamma rays, while post-flight blood samples were collected shortly and several months after landing. Here, in a study of 43 crew-missions, we investigated whether individual radiosensitivity, as determined by the ex vivo dose-response of the pre-flight chromosome aberration rate (CAR), contributes to the prediction of the post-flight CAR incurred from the radiation exposure during missions. Random-effects Poisson regression was used to estimate subject-specific radiosensitivities from the preflight dose-response data, which were in turn used to predict post-flight CAR and subject-specific relative biological effectiveness (RBEs) between space radiation and gamma radiation. Covariates age, gender were also considered. Results indicate that there is predictive value in background CAR as well as radiosensitivity determined preflight for explaining individual differences in post-flight CAR over and above that which could be explained by BFO dose alone. The in vivo RBE for space radiation was estimated to be approximately 3 relative to the ex vivo dose response to gamma irradiation. In addition, pre-flight radiosensitivity tended to be higher for individuals having a higher background CAR, suggesting that individuals with greater radiosensitivity can be more sensitive to other environmental stressors encountered in daily life. We also noted that both background CAR and radiosensitivity tend to increase with age, although both are highly variable. Finally, we observed no significant difference between the observed CAR shortly after mission and at > 6 months post-mission. Semones, Edward 2021-03-22T13:53:52Z George, Kerry Shavers, Mark Shavers, Mark Predicting chromosome damage in astronauts participating in international space station missions Crucian, Brian Zhang, Ye George, Kerry Moreno-Villanueva, Maria 2021-03-22T13:53:52Z Semones, Edward Wu, Honglu Attribution 4.0 International Wu, Honglu Zhang, Ye eng 2021-03-05

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