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When the alternative would have been better : Counterfactual reasoning and the emergence of regret

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When the alternative would have been better : Counterfactual reasoning and the emergence of regret

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RAFETSEDER, Eva, Josef PERNER, 2012. When the alternative would have been better : Counterfactual reasoning and the emergence of regret. In: Cognition & Emotion. Taylor & Francis Group. 26(5), pp. 800-819. ISSN 0269-9931. eISSN 1464-0600. Available under: doi: 10.1080/02699931.2011.619744

@article{Rafetseder2012alter-52464, title={When the alternative would have been better : Counterfactual reasoning and the emergence of regret}, year={2012}, doi={10.1080/02699931.2011.619744}, number={5}, volume={26}, issn={0269-9931}, journal={Cognition & Emotion}, pages={800--819}, author={Rafetseder, Eva and Perner, Josef} }

Perner, Josef 2021-01-15T11:47:32Z terms-of-use Rafetseder, Eva Counterfactual reasoning about how events could have turned out better is associated with the feeling of regret. However, developmental studies show a discrepancy between the onset of counterfactual reasoning (at 3 years) and the feeling of regret (at 6 years). In four experiments we explored possible reasons. Experiment 1 (3- to 6-year-old children) and Experiment 2 (adult control) show that even when regret is assessed more directly than in previous studies (e.g., Amsel & Smalley, 2000) only adults but not children regret their decision. Experiment 3 (3- to 14-year-old children) suggests that double-questioning--asking children how happy they are with what they got before and after they had seen what they could have got--creates false positive indications of regret in the youngest children and that--when controlling for false positives--regret is not evident before 9 years. However, children before this age make a difference between attractive (three candies) and less attractive (one candy) items (Experiment 4; 6- to 8-year-old children). Taken together, this suggests that before 9 years of age children base their judgements solely on what they got without taking into account what they could have got. eng Rafetseder, Eva Perner, Josef 2012 When the alternative would have been better : Counterfactual reasoning and the emergence of regret 2021-01-15T11:47:32Z

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