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Virtual reality as a tool for balance research : Eyes open body sway is reproduced in photo-realistic, but not in abstract virtual scenes

Virtual reality as a tool for balance research : Eyes open body sway is reproduced in photo-realistic, but not in abstract virtual scenes

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ASSLÄNDER, Lorenz, Stephan STREUBER, 2020. Virtual reality as a tool for balance research : Eyes open body sway is reproduced in photo-realistic, but not in abstract virtual scenes. In: PLoS one. Public Library of Science (PLoS). 15(10), e0241479. eISSN 1932-6203. Available under: doi: 10.1371/journal.pone.0241479

@article{Asslander2020Virtu-51763, title={Virtual reality as a tool for balance research : Eyes open body sway is reproduced in photo-realistic, but not in abstract virtual scenes}, year={2020}, doi={10.1371/journal.pone.0241479}, number={10}, volume={15}, journal={PLoS one}, author={Assländer, Lorenz and Streuber, Stephan}, note={Article Number: e0241479} }

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