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“Closer‐to‐home” strategy benefits juvenile survival in a long‐distance migratory bird

“Closer‐to‐home” strategy benefits juvenile survival in a long‐distance migratory bird

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CHENG, Yachang, Wolfgang FIEDLER, Martin WIKELSKI, Andrea FLACK, 2019. “Closer‐to‐home” strategy benefits juvenile survival in a long‐distance migratory bird. In: Ecology and Evolution. Wiley. 9(16). ISSN 2045-7758. eISSN 2045-7758. Available under: doi: 10.1002/ece3.5395

@article{Cheng2019-08Close-46549, title={“Closer‐to‐home” strategy benefits juvenile survival in a long‐distance migratory bird}, year={2019}, doi={10.1002/ece3.5395}, number={16}, volume={9}, issn={2045-7758}, journal={Ecology and Evolution}, author={Cheng, Yachang and Fiedler, Wolfgang and Wikelski, Martin and Flack, Andrea} }

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