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Exploring the Potential Distinction Between Continuous Traumatic Stress and Posttraumatic Stress in an East African Refugee Sample

Exploring the Potential Distinction Between Continuous Traumatic Stress and Posttraumatic Stress in an East African Refugee Sample

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Prüfsumme: MD5:31ea386f1cb7285f49851fa9afc5ba14

HECKER, Tobias, Herbert E. AINAMANI, Katharin HERMENAU, Eva HAEFELE, Thomas ELBERT, 2017. Exploring the Potential Distinction Between Continuous Traumatic Stress and Posttraumatic Stress in an East African Refugee Sample. In: Clinical Psychological Science. 5(6), pp. 964-973. ISSN 2167-7026. eISSN 2167-7034. Available under: doi: 10.1177/2167702617717023

@article{Hecker2017-11Explo-41287, title={Exploring the Potential Distinction Between Continuous Traumatic Stress and Posttraumatic Stress in an East African Refugee Sample}, year={2017}, doi={10.1177/2167702617717023}, number={6}, volume={5}, issn={2167-7026}, journal={Clinical Psychological Science}, pages={964--973}, author={Hecker, Tobias and Ainamani, Herbert E. and Hermenau, Katharin and Haefele, Eva and Elbert, Thomas} }

eng Exploring the Potential Distinction Between Continuous Traumatic Stress and Posttraumatic Stress in an East African Refugee Sample Hermenau, Katharin Hecker, Tobias 2018-02-09T14:35:56Z terms-of-use Ainamani, Herbert E. Elbert, Thomas Elbert, Thomas Hecker, Tobias Haefele, Eva Ainamani, Herbert E. Posttraumatic stress (PTS) indicates a continuous stress response that persists though threats to life had been experienced in the past. However, threats to life are frequently ongoing. For these contexts, the concept of continuous traumatic stress (CTS) has been put forward. Based on structured clinical interviews with Congolese refugees (N = 226), this study investigated the CTS concept and whether it can be distinguished from PTS. We found that current exposure to violence correlated positively with concerns about its recurrence in the CTS group (r = .46). An ANCOVA indicated that higher intrusion symptom severity in the PTS group (no symptom reduction under safe conditions) was explained by higher lifetime trauma exposure (η<sup>2</sup> = .125). In contexts of continuous trauma exposure, symptom-like responses may be regarded as appropriate responses to realistic danger. In these contexts, the possibility that symptom changes are a response to real threats should be considered to avoid overestimation of PTSD prevalences. Hermenau, Katharin 2017-11 Haefele, Eva 2018-02-09T14:35:56Z

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