English is (still) a West Germanic language

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BECH, Kristin, George WALKDEN, 2016. English is (still) a West Germanic language. In: Nordic Journal of Linguistics. 39(1), pp. 65-100. ISSN 0332-5865. eISSN 1502-4717

@article{Bech2016-05Engli-38536, title={English is (still) a West Germanic language}, year={2016}, doi={10.1017/S0332586515000219}, number={1}, volume={39}, issn={0332-5865}, journal={Nordic Journal of Linguistics}, pages={65--100}, author={Bech, Kristin and Walkden, George} }

2017-04-20T09:35:49Z Bech, Kristin Walkden, George 2017-04-20T09:35:49Z In their recent book, English: The Language of the Vikings, Joseph Embley Emonds and Jan Terje Faarlund attempt to make the case that from its Middle period onwards, English is a North Germanic language, descended from the Norse varieties spoken in Medieval England, rather than a West Germanic language, as traditionally assumed. In this review article we critique Emonds & Faarlund's proposal, focusing particularly on the syntactic evidence that forms the basis of their argumentation. A closer look at a number of constructions for which the authors suggest a Norse origin reveals that the situation is not as they present it: in many cases, the syntactic properties of Old and Middle English are not given careful enough consideration, and/or the chronology of the developments is not compatible with a Norse origin. Moreover, the authors do not engage with the large body of sound changes that constitute the strongest evidence for a West Germanic origin. We conclude that Emonds & Faarlund fail to make a convincing case either for a North Germanic origin or against a West Germanic origin. eng 2016-05 Walkden, George Bech, Kristin English is (still) a West Germanic language

Dateiabrufe seit 20.04.2017 (Informationen über die Zugriffsstatistik)

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