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Physiological adaptations to chronic stress in healthy humans : why might the sexes have evolved different energy utilisation strategies?

Physiological adaptations to chronic stress in healthy humans : why might the sexes have evolved different energy utilisation strategies?

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JONES, Alexander, Jens C. PRUESSNER, Merlin R. MCMILLAN, Russell W. JONES, Grzegorz T. KOWALIK, Jennifer A. STEEDEN, Bryan WILLIAMS, Andrew M. TAYLOR, Vivek MUTHURANGU, 2016. Physiological adaptations to chronic stress in healthy humans : why might the sexes have evolved different energy utilisation strategies?. In: The Journal of Physiology. 594(15), pp. 4297-4307. ISSN 0022-3751. eISSN 1469-7793. Available under: doi: 10.1113/JP272021

@article{Jones2016-08-01Physi-38175, title={Physiological adaptations to chronic stress in healthy humans : why might the sexes have evolved different energy utilisation strategies?}, year={2016}, doi={10.1113/JP272021}, number={15}, volume={594}, issn={0022-3751}, journal={The Journal of Physiology}, pages={4297--4307}, author={Jones, Alexander and Pruessner, Jens C. and McMillan, Merlin R. and Jones, Russell W. and Kowalik, Grzegorz T. and Steeden, Jennifer A. and Williams, Bryan and Taylor, Andrew M. and Muthurangu, Vivek} }

<rdf:RDF xmlns:dcterms="http://purl.org/dc/terms/" xmlns:dc="http://purl.org/dc/elements/1.1/" xmlns:rdf="http://www.w3.org/1999/02/22-rdf-syntax-ns#" xmlns:bibo="http://purl.org/ontology/bibo/" xmlns:dspace="http://digital-repositories.org/ontologies/dspace/0.1.0#" xmlns:foaf="http://xmlns.com/foaf/0.1/" xmlns:void="http://rdfs.org/ns/void#" xmlns:xsd="http://www.w3.org/2001/XMLSchema#" > <rdf:Description rdf:about="https://kops.uni-konstanz.de/rdf/resource/123456789/38175"> <dc:contributor>Williams, Bryan</dc:contributor> <dc:creator>Williams, Bryan</dc:creator> <dcterms:available rdf:datatype="http://www.w3.org/2001/XMLSchema#dateTime">2017-03-28T13:10:03Z</dcterms:available> <dc:language>eng</dc:language> <dc:contributor>McMillan, Merlin R.</dc:contributor> <dc:creator>Pruessner, Jens C.</dc:creator> <dc:contributor>Jones, Russell W.</dc:contributor> <dc:contributor>Steeden, Jennifer A.</dc:contributor> <dc:creator>Jones, Alexander</dc:creator> <bibo:uri rdf:resource="https://kops.uni-konstanz.de/handle/123456789/38175"/> <dc:creator>Muthurangu, Vivek</dc:creator> <dcterms:abstract xml:lang="eng">Obesity and associated diseases, such as cardiovascular disease, are the dominant human health problems in the modern era. Humans develop these conditions partly because they consume excess energy and exercise too little. Stress might be one of the factors contributing to these disease-promoting behaviours. We postulate that sex-specific primordial energy optimisation strategies exist, which developed to help cope with chronic stress but have become maladaptive in modern societies, worsening health. To demonstrate the existence of these energy optimisation strategies, we recruited 88 healthy adults with varying adiposity and chronic stress exposure. Cardiovascular physiology at rest and during acute stress (Montreal Imaging Stress Task), and body fat distribution were measured using advanced magnetic resonance imaging methods, together with endocrine function, cardiovascular energy use and cognitive performance. Potential confounders such as lifestyle, social class and employment were accounted for. We found that women exposed to chronic stress had lower adiposity, greater acute stress cardiovascular responses and better cognitive performance. Conversely, chronic stress-exposed men had greater adiposity and lower cardiovascular responses to acute stress. These results provide initial support for our hypothesis that differing sex-specific energy conservation strategies exist. We propose that these strategies have initially evolved to benefit humans but are now maladaptive and increase the risk of disorders such as obesity, especially in men exposed to chronic stress.</dcterms:abstract> <dcterms:isPartOf rdf:resource="https://kops.uni-konstanz.de/rdf/resource/123456789/43"/> <dc:creator>Jones, Russell W.</dc:creator> <dc:creator>Steeden, Jennifer A.</dc:creator> <dc:contributor>Jones, Alexander</dc:contributor> <dcterms:issued>2016-08-01</dcterms:issued> <dspace:isPartOfCollection rdf:resource="https://kops.uni-konstanz.de/rdf/resource/123456789/43"/> <foaf:homepage rdf:resource="http://localhost:8080/jspui"/> <dc:contributor>Taylor, Andrew M.</dc:contributor> <dc:creator>Kowalik, Grzegorz T.</dc:creator> <dc:contributor>Pruessner, Jens C.</dc:contributor> <dc:contributor>Muthurangu, Vivek</dc:contributor> <dc:date rdf:datatype="http://www.w3.org/2001/XMLSchema#dateTime">2017-03-28T13:10:03Z</dc:date> <dc:contributor>Kowalik, Grzegorz T.</dc:contributor> <dc:creator>Taylor, Andrew M.</dc:creator> <dcterms:title>Physiological adaptations to chronic stress in healthy humans : why might the sexes have evolved different energy utilisation strategies?</dcterms:title> <void:sparqlEndpoint rdf:resource="http://localhost/fuseki/dspace/sparql"/> <dc:creator>McMillan, Merlin R.</dc:creator> </rdf:Description> </rdf:RDF>

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