Does Prenatal Stress Shape Postnatal Resilience? : An Epigenome-Wide Study on Violence and Mental Health in Humans

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2019
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Radtke, Karl M.
Hecker, Tobias
Sill, Johanna
Vukojevic, Vanja
Assis, Simone Gonçalves de
Schauer, Maggie
Elbert, Thomas
Nätt, Daniel
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Frontiers in Genetics. 2019, 10, 269. eISSN 1664-8021. Available under: doi: 10.3389/fgene.2019.00269
Zusammenfassung

Stress during pregnancy widely associates with epigenetic changes and psychiatric problems during childhood. Animal studies, however, show that under specific postnatal conditions prenatal stress may have other, less detrimental consequences for the offspring. Here, we studied mental health and epigenome-wide DNA methylation in saliva following intimate partner violence (IPV) during pregnancy in São Gonçalo, a Brazilian city with high levels of violence. Not surprisingly, mothers exposed to pregnancy IPV expressed elevated depression, PTSD and anxiety symptoms. Children had similar psychiatric problems when they experienced maternal IPV after being born. More surprisingly, when maternal IPV occurred both during (prenatal) and after pregnancy these problems were absent. Following prenatal IPV, genomic sites in genes encoding the glucocorticoid receptor (NR3C1) and its repressor FKBP51 (FKBP5) were among the most differentially methylated and indicated an enhanced ability to terminate hormonal stress responses in prenatally stressed children. These children also showed more DNA methylation in heterochromatin-like regions, which previously has been associated with stress/disease resilience. A similar relationship was seen in prenatally stressed middle-eastern refugees of the same age as the São Gonçalo children but exposed to postnatal war-related violence. While our study is limited in location and sample size, it provides novel insights on how prenatal stress may epigenetically shape resilience in humans, possibly through interactions with the postnatal environment. This translates animal findings and emphasizes the importance to account for population differences when studying how early life gene–environment interactions affects mental health.

Zusammenfassung in einer weiteren Sprache
Fachgebiet (DDC)
150 Psychologie
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prenatal stress, intimate partner violence, NR3C1, FKBP5, psychiatric resilience, DNA methylation, retrotransposon, heterochromatin
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ISO 690SERPELONI, Fernanda, Karl M. RADTKE, Tobias HECKER, Johanna SILL, Vanja VUKOJEVIC, Simone Gonçalves de ASSIS, Maggie SCHAUER, Thomas ELBERT, Daniel NÄTT, 2019. Does Prenatal Stress Shape Postnatal Resilience? : An Epigenome-Wide Study on Violence and Mental Health in Humans. In: Frontiers in Genetics. 2019, 10, 269. eISSN 1664-8021. Available under: doi: 10.3389/fgene.2019.00269
BibTex
@article{Serpeloni2019-04-16Prena-46578,
  year={2019},
  doi={10.3389/fgene.2019.00269},
  title={Does Prenatal Stress Shape Postnatal Resilience? : An Epigenome-Wide Study on Violence and Mental Health in Humans},
  volume={10},
  journal={Frontiers in Genetics},
  author={Serpeloni, Fernanda and Radtke, Karl M. and Hecker, Tobias and Sill, Johanna and Vukojevic, Vanja and Assis, Simone Gonçalves de and Schauer, Maggie and Elbert, Thomas and Nätt, Daniel},
  note={Article Number: 269}
}
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