Design of artificial, ribozyme-based genetic switches in bacteria

Lade...
Vorschaubild
Dateien
Markus_Wieland_Dissertation.pdf
Markus_Wieland_Dissertation.pdfGröße: 1.95 MBDownloads: 3380
Datum
2010
Autor:innen
Herausgeber:innen
Kontakt
ISSN der Zeitschrift
Electronic ISSN
ISBN
Bibliografische Daten
Verlag
Schriftenreihe
Auflagebezeichnung
DOI (zitierfähiger Link)
ArXiv-ID
Internationale Patentnummer
EU-Projektnummer
DFG-Projektnummer
Projekt
Open Access-Veröffentlichung
Sammlungen
Gesperrt bis
Titel in einer weiteren Sprache
Forschungsvorhaben
Organisationseinheiten
Zeitschriftenheft
Publikationstyp
Dissertation
Publikationsstatus
unikn.publication.listelement.citation.prefix.version.undefined
Zusammenfassung

The aim of this PhD thesis was the design and construction of Hammerhead ribozyme-based riboswitches that control gene expression in E. coli.
At the beginning of this work, such switches were already developed for eukaryotic cells by inserting the HHR into the non-coding sequences of a reporter mRNA. HHR self-cleavage detached the essential 5 -cap or 3 -poly(A) tail from the mRNA thus severely decreasing mRNA stability and eventually gene expression levels. Since the genetic machinery of E. coli differs strongly, a simple transfer of this way of action was not feasible. In deed, it was necessary to conceive a novel and sophisticated mechanism for the HHR to effect reporter gene expression.
The starting point of this work was to implement the HHR into a bacterial mRNA coding for the reporter gene. Inspired by the natural occurring riboswitches, we aimed for regulation of translation initiation by sequestering / liberating the accessibility of the ribosome binding site (RBS). In order to achieve that, we incorporated the RBS in an extended stem I of the HHR scaffold thereby inhibiting ribosome binding. Only upon self-cleavage is the RBS liberated and reporter gene expression is induced. This HHR setup is highly advantageous for its use in bacteria: On the one hand, it allows the formation of tertiary interactions between ribozyme stem I and II which are essential for effective cleavage in vivo. On the other hand, stem III sequence is completely variable thus presenting a promising position for attaching aptamer domains in order to externally regulate ribozyme activity and eventually gene expression levels.
A major task in the construction of such allosteric ribozymes has always been the optimization of the connection sequence between the two functional domains. For the construction of aptamer-regulated HHRs (HHAz) in vivo, it can not be taken for granted that aptazymes optimized in vitro can be transferred in living beings although it was successfully performed in another attempt. Therefore we established an in vivo screening method in order to directly identify relevant connection sequences in the context where they are actually used. Applying this method we constructed a theophylline-dependent aptazyme which was capable of inducing gene expression almost ten fold after ligand addition to the growth medium. For the first time, this setup provided the opportunity to use an aptazyme for bacterial gene expression control.
Based on this mechanistic design, we exchanged the artificially derived theophylline aptamer sequence with the TPP aptamer domain from the corresponding natural riboswitch. After another in vivo screening, we identified several clones inducing as well as inhibiting gene expression. The simple but effective exchange of the aptamer domains in these switches is an impressive proof for the generalizable use of RNA domains. It would be very interesting to investigate if other natural aptamer domains could be used in this setup, too.
By attaching an additional fourth helical region to the HHR scaffold and its subsequent implementation in the bacterial mRNA context, we were able to introduce a further insertion site for an aptamer domain. As a proof of concept, we attached the theophylline aptamer to this fourth site, performed an in vivo screening and eventually identified one variant which showed theophylline-dependent induction of ribozyme activity and eventually eGFP expression. This additional attachment-site could be very valuable for the construction of logic gates based on an HHR with two simultaneously attached aptamers in E. coli. Furthermore, the expanded HHR scaffold enables its use as a gene silencer acting in trans by cleaving a recognition site on an mRNA without interfering with the formation of the catalytically important tertiary interactions between stem I and II. This is currently pursued in collaboration with the laboratory of Prof. Dr. Citti, Italy. Noteworthy, the design of the expanded HHR scaffold was strongly inspired by natural three-way junctions thereby again demonstrating the general combinability of certain RNA elements with each other.
Besides aptazyme-mediated regulation of translation initiation, we also used the HHR to control tRNA and splicing activity as well as ribosome stability.
For the regulation of tRNA activity, we conceived a comparable gain of function mechanism as used in the mRNA context: We integrated essential elements of the tRNA in stem I of the HHR thereby destroying the typical tRNA cloverleaf structure. The new fold is not recognized anymore by essential tRNA processing enzymes leaving this tRNA to be inoperative in translation. By self-cleavage, however, the original tRNA fold is rescued and the tRNA can be eventually used in translation. Ligand-controlled tRNA activity was achieved by transferring the mRNA-based theophylline-dependent aptazyme to this new setup hence again proofing the generalizable use of RNA elements once identified.
In order to render ribosome stability small molecule-dependent, we simply inserted a TPP-dependent aptazyme in helix 6 of the 16 S rRNA. Interestingly, the HHR scaffold inserted at this position did not interfere with ribosome activity in vivo, while self-cleavage almost completely inactivated it. By an in vivo screening, we identified once more TPP-dependent aptazyme variants which are either inducing or inhibiting catalytic activity. One of the identified variants featured the identical connection sequence as a variant origination from the mRNA context. Again, this is a very impressive example for the compatibility of RNA domains inserted in different surroundings as well as a validation for the screening method itself. In future, these aptazyme-dependent ribosome variants could be used to construct artificial gene networks in which expression levels of several genes have to be controlled simultaneously. Moreover, it might represent an interesting tool for in vitro and in vivo characterization of 16 S rRNA folding.
Finally, we were also able to control group I splicing activity in E. coli in a comparable way as already shown with the 16 S rRNA by inserting the HHR into helix 10 of the Tetrahymena thermophila intron. While the ribozyme scaffold itself did not interfere with splicing activity, HHR self-cleavage had a strong effect on splicing-activity.
As a conclusion of this thesis, we have shown that the Hammerhead ribozyme represents a very powerful and versatile tool for the artificial regulation of gene expression in E. coli. The constructed switches follow a rationally-designed and protein-independent mechanism and the developed RNA parts are highly interchangeable between several surroundings (mRNA, tRNA, and rRNA). Moreover, it has been show that at least the theophylline-dependent HHAz can be also transferred to eukaryotic systems while retaining its switching properties (Master thesis of Patrick Ketzer and Simon Ausländer and).
For synthetic biology, it would be very appealing to combine several of these switches in order to construct genetic circuits. Our lab has recently shown, that it is possible to combine several of the here presented switches in one system in order to design complex logic gates. Considering the small size of ribozyme-based compared to the protein-based switches, the use of the RNA parts might be advantageous.

Zusammenfassung in einer weiteren Sprache

Ziel dieser Doktorarbeit war es, mit Hilfe des Hammerhead Ribozyms neuartige RNA Schalter zu entwickeln und damit Genexpression in E. coli zu steuern.
Solche Schalter wurden bereits zuvor für eukaryontische Zellen entwickelt, indem man das HHR in die nicht-kodierenden Bereiche einer Boten RNA eingefügt hatte. Durch die Selbstspaltung des HHR wurde das 5 -cap oder der 3 -poly(A) Bereich von der mRNA abgetrennt, mit der Folge, dass die mRNA destabilisiert und dadurch die Genexpression inhibiert wurde. Da diese einfache Wirkungsweise des HHR nicht ohne weiteres in E. coli übertragen werden kann, musste zuerst ein neues Konzept entwickelt werden, wie bakterielle Genexpression durch intramolekulare HHR gesteuert werden könnte.
In Anlehnung an die eukaryontischen HHR-basierten Systeme sollte das Ribozym anfangs in die mRNA eines Reportergens eingeführt werden. Der zugrunde liegende Mechanismus orientierte sich dabei an natürlich vorkommenden RNA Schaltern und zielte darauf, die Sekundärstrukur der Ribosomen Bindestelle (RBS) zu verändern, um so die Translationsinitiation zu regulieren. Dazu integrierten wir die RBS in eine verlängerte Helix I des HHR und verhinderten dadurch die Ribosomenbindung an die mRNA. Nur durch die Selbstspaltung wurde die RBS wieder frei zugänglich für das Ribosom und gestattete erst daraufhin die Translation des Reportergens. Dieser Aufbau hat den Vorteil, dass die tertiären Wechselwirkungen zwischen den Ribozymhelices I und II nicht beeinflusst und so überhaupt erst effiziente Spaltung in vivo ermöglicht wird. Außerdem kann dabei die Sequenz von Helix III völlig frei variiert werden. Dies eröffnet die Möglichkeit, ein Aptamer zur externen Kontrolle der Ribozymaktivität und damit auch der Genexpression einzuführen. Das Hauptproblem bei der Konstruktion solcher allosterischen Ribozyme ist dabei gewöhnlich die Identifikation einer Verbindungssequenz, die die beiden funktionalen RNA Domänen in geeigneter Weise miteinander verknüpft. Es kann leider nicht davon ausgegangen werden, dass in vitro hergestellte Aptazyme auch in vivo vergleichbare Funktionalität aufweisen, obwohl ein Transfer in manchen Fällen wohl doch glücken kann. Nichtsdestotrotz entschieden wir uns dazu, relevante Verbindungssequenzen direkt in vivo zu identifizieren. Mittels dieser Methode konnten wir schlussendlich ein Theophyllin-abhängiges Aptazym konstruieren, welches die Expression des Reportergens fast zehnfach induzieren konnte, wenn man den Liganden zum Wachstumsmedium hinzu gab. Damit wurde zum ersten Mal ein Aptazym zur Kontrolle der bakteriellen Genexpression verwendet.
Mit diesem Konstrukt als Grundlage tauschten wir daraufhin das Theophyllin Aptamer gegen die Aptamerdomäne des natürlichen TPP RNA Schalters aus. Erneut suchten wir in vivo nach schaltbaren Varianten und identifizierten dieses Mal mehrere Klone, die die Genexpression entweder induzierten oder hemmten. Dieser einfache aber effektive Austausch der Aptamerdomänen ist ein eindrucksvolles Beispiel für die verallgemeinerbare Funktionalität von RNA Domänen. Es wäre äußerst interessant herauszufinden, ob noch weitere Aptamerdomänen von natürlichen RNA Schaltern in dem von uns entworfenen Ribozym-basierten System benutzt werden könnten.
Des Weiteren konnten wir das HHR um eine zusätzliche vierte Helix erweitern, wobei die katalytische Aktivität in vitro und in vivo weitestgehend erhalten blieb. Diese vierte Helix konnte durch das Theophyllin Aptamer ersetzt werden, wobei wiederum in E. coli nach schaltbaren Klonen mit geeigneten Verknüpfungs-sequenzen gesucht werden musste. In diesem Fall konnten wir eine Variante identifizieren und charakterisieren, deren Ribozymaktivität und damit in der Folge auch Genexpression durch Zugabe von Theophyllin induziert wurde.
Das um eine Helix erweiterte HHR könnte sich als äußerst wertvoll bei der Konstruktion von Logischen Gattern in E. coli erweisen: Würde man Helix III und IV gleichzeitig durch verschiedene regulative Aptamere ersetzen, könnte man so auf einfache Weise Ribozym-basierte Boolesche Schalter entwickeln. Außerdem ist das erweiterte HHR prädestiniert dazu, auch intermolekular definierte Gene durch Spaltung derer mRNA auszuschalten. Die zusätzliche vierte Helix erlaubt, im Gegensatz zum natürlichen HHR, eine intermolekulare Bindung an fast jede beliebige Sequenz ohne dass dadurch die katalytisch wichtigen tertiären Wechselwirkungen beeinflusst werden. Dies wird zurzeit in Zusammenarbeit mit dem Labor von Prof. Dr. Citti genauer untersucht.
Neben der gerade beschriebenen Regulation der Ribosomenbindung an die mRNA, benutzten wir das HHR um sowohl die Aktivität einer tRNA oder des Splicings als auch die Stabilität des Ribosoms zu regulieren.
Für die Kontrolle der tRNA Aktivität entwarfen wir einen vergleichbaren Mechanismus wie für die mRNA: Wieder integrierten wir einen wichtigen Sequenzabschnitt der tRNA in die Helix I des HHR und zerstörten damit die für die tRNA typische Kleeblattfaltung. Die neu entstandene Struktur konnte daraufhin nicht mehr von den notwendigen, tRNA prozessierenden Enzymen erkannt werden und führte dazu, dass diese tRNA nicht mehr bei der Translation zur Verfügung stand. Sobald das HHR sich aber von der tRNA abgespalten hatte, wurde die ursprüngliche Faltung wieder hergestellt und die tRNA konnte während der Translation benutzt werden. Daraufhin übertrugen wir das aus dem mRNA Kontext stammende Theophyllin-abhängige Aptazyme in dieses Konstrukt und konnten so sogar Ligand-abhängige tRNA Aktivität erhalten. Dies zeigte wieder einmal, wie vielfältig einsetzbar funktionale RNA Elemente sein können.
Die Kontrolle über die Stabilität des Ribosoms konnten wir erlangen, indem wir ein TPP-abhängiges Aptazym in Helix 6 der 16 S rRNA einfügten. Erstaunlicherweise beeinträchtigte das an dieser Stelle eingefügte HHR nicht die Ribosomen Aktivität in vivo, wohingegen die Ribozym-Selbstspaltung es fast komplett desaktivierte. Wieder konnten wir in vivo jeweils eine Aptazymvariante identifizieren, die die Ribosomenaktivität entweder induzierte oder hemmte. Wir waren erfreut zu sehen, dass eine der beiden gefundenen Verknüpfungssequenzen identisch mit einer Variante aus dem mRNA Kontext ist. Dies zeigt nochmals die Kompatibilität von verschiedenen RNA Elementen in unterschiedlichsten Umgebungen, ist aber auch eine Bestätigung für unsere in vivo Identifikationsmethode von Verknüpfungssequenzen. Die Aptazym-abhängigen Ribosom Varianten könnten in Zukunft bei der Herstellung von künstlichen Gen-Netzwerken, bei denen mehrere Gene gleichzeitig geschaltet werden, Verwendung finden. Außerdem könnten sich diese Aptazyme als wichtiges Werkzeug zur in vitro und in vivo Charakterisierung der 16 S rRNA Faltung erweisen.
Zuletzt konnten wir ebenfalls die Aktivität des Gruppe I Splicings, in vergleichbarer Weise wie gerade mit der 16 S rRNA beschrieben, kontrollieren, indem wir das HHR in die Helix 10 des Tetrahymena thermophila Introns einfügten. Dabei beeinträchtigte die HHR Sequenz an sich nicht die Splicing-Aktivität, während die HHR vermittelte Selbstspaltung einen starken Einfluss darauf hatte.
Zusammenfassend haben wir gezeigt, dass das Hammerhead Ribozym eine vielfältig einsetzbare Plattform zur künstlichen Genregulation in E. coli darstellen kann. Die hier konstruierten RNA Schalter gehorchen einem rational entworfenen und Protein-unabhängigem Mechanismus und sind gleichzeitig sehr einfach austauschbar zwischen unterschiedlichsten RNA Spezies (mRNA, tRNA, rRNA). Des Weiteren konnte zumindest für das Theophyllin-abhängige HHAz gezeigt werden, dass seine Funktionalität in eukaryontischen Systemen in der mRNA (Masterarbeit von Patrick Ketzer und Simon Ausländer) und in einer miRNA erhalten bleibt.
Für die Synthetische Biologie wäre es interessant, mehrer dieser RNA Schalter miteinander zu verknüpfen um damit komplexe Gen-Netzwerke herzustellen. Wir haben erst kürzlich in unserem Labor zeigen können, dass es im Prinzip möglich ist, mehrerer unserer RNA Schalter zu verknüpfen. Wir versuchen nun damit verschiedenste Boolesche Schalter herzustellen. Zieht man die kleine Größe der Ribozym-basierten besonders im Vergleich zu den Protein-basierten Genschaltern in Betracht, wären die RNA Elemente besonders bei komplizierten Netzwerken klar im Vorteil.

Fachgebiet (DDC)
570 Biowissenschaften, Biologie
Schlagwörter
Genetische Schalter, Aptamer, Hammerhead Ribozyme, Ribozyme, Aptamer, genetic Switch
Konferenz
Rezension
undefined / . - undefined, undefined
Zitieren
ISO 690WIELAND, Markus, 2010. Design of artificial, ribozyme-based genetic switches in bacteria [Dissertation]. Konstanz: University of Konstanz
BibTex
@phdthesis{Wieland2010Desig-9677,
  year={2010},
  title={Design of artificial, ribozyme-based genetic switches in bacteria},
  author={Wieland, Markus},
  address={Konstanz},
  school={Universität Konstanz}
}
RDF
<rdf:RDF
    xmlns:dcterms="http://purl.org/dc/terms/"
    xmlns:dc="http://purl.org/dc/elements/1.1/"
    xmlns:rdf="http://www.w3.org/1999/02/22-rdf-syntax-ns#"
    xmlns:bibo="http://purl.org/ontology/bibo/"
    xmlns:dspace="http://digital-repositories.org/ontologies/dspace/0.1.0#"
    xmlns:foaf="http://xmlns.com/foaf/0.1/"
    xmlns:void="http://rdfs.org/ns/void#"
    xmlns:xsd="http://www.w3.org/2001/XMLSchema#" > 
  <rdf:Description rdf:about="https://kops.uni-konstanz.de/server/rdf/resource/123456789/9677">
    <dcterms:title>Design of artificial, ribozyme-based genetic switches in bacteria</dcterms:title>
    <bibo:uri rdf:resource="http://kops.uni-konstanz.de/handle/123456789/9677"/>
    <dc:creator>Wieland, Markus</dc:creator>
    <dspace:hasBitstream rdf:resource="https://kops.uni-konstanz.de/bitstream/123456789/9677/1/Markus_Wieland_Dissertation.pdf"/>
    <dspace:isPartOfCollection rdf:resource="https://kops.uni-konstanz.de/server/rdf/resource/123456789/29"/>
    <dcterms:abstract xml:lang="eng">The aim of this PhD thesis was the design and construction of Hammerhead ribozyme-based riboswitches that control gene expression in E. coli.&lt;br /&gt;At the beginning of this work, such switches were already developed for eukaryotic cells by inserting the HHR into the non-coding sequences of a reporter mRNA. HHR self-cleavage detached the essential 5 -cap or 3 -poly(A) tail from the mRNA thus severely decreasing mRNA stability and eventually gene expression levels. Since the genetic machinery of E. coli differs strongly, a simple transfer of this way of action was not feasible. In deed, it was necessary to conceive a novel and sophisticated mechanism for the HHR to effect reporter gene expression.&lt;br /&gt;The starting point of this work was to implement the HHR into a bacterial mRNA coding for the reporter gene. Inspired by the natural occurring riboswitches, we aimed for regulation of translation initiation by sequestering / liberating the accessibility of the ribosome binding site (RBS). In order to achieve that, we incorporated the RBS in an extended stem I of the HHR scaffold thereby inhibiting ribosome binding. Only upon self-cleavage is the RBS liberated and reporter gene expression is induced. This HHR setup is highly advantageous for its use in bacteria: On the one hand, it allows the formation of tertiary interactions between ribozyme stem I and II which are essential for effective cleavage in vivo. On the other hand, stem III sequence is completely variable thus presenting a promising position for attaching aptamer domains in order to externally regulate ribozyme activity and eventually gene expression levels.&lt;br /&gt;A major task in the construction of such allosteric ribozymes has always been the optimization of the connection sequence between the two functional domains. For the construction of aptamer-regulated HHRs (HHAz) in vivo, it can not be taken for granted that aptazymes optimized in vitro can be transferred in living beings although it was successfully performed in another attempt. Therefore we established an in vivo screening method in order to directly identify relevant connection sequences in the context where they are actually used. Applying this method we constructed a theophylline-dependent aptazyme which was capable of inducing gene expression almost ten fold after ligand addition to the growth medium. For the first time, this setup provided the opportunity to use an aptazyme for bacterial gene expression control.&lt;br /&gt;Based on this mechanistic design, we exchanged the artificially derived theophylline aptamer sequence with the TPP aptamer domain from the corresponding natural riboswitch. After another in vivo screening, we identified several clones inducing as well as inhibiting gene expression. The simple but effective exchange of the aptamer domains in these switches is an impressive proof for the generalizable use of RNA domains. It would be very interesting to investigate if other natural aptamer domains could be used in this setup, too.&lt;br /&gt;By attaching an additional fourth helical region to the HHR scaffold and its subsequent implementation in the bacterial mRNA context, we were able to introduce a further insertion site for an aptamer domain. As a proof of concept, we attached the theophylline aptamer to this fourth site, performed an in vivo screening and eventually identified one variant which showed theophylline-dependent induction of ribozyme activity and eventually eGFP expression. This additional attachment-site could be very valuable for the construction of logic gates based on an HHR with two simultaneously attached aptamers in E. coli. Furthermore, the expanded HHR scaffold enables its use as a gene silencer acting in trans by cleaving a recognition site on an mRNA without interfering with the formation of the catalytically important tertiary interactions between stem I and II. This is currently pursued in collaboration with the laboratory of Prof. Dr. Citti, Italy. Noteworthy, the design of the expanded HHR scaffold was strongly inspired by natural three-way junctions thereby again demonstrating the general combinability of certain RNA elements with each other.&lt;br /&gt;Besides aptazyme-mediated regulation of translation initiation, we also used the HHR to control tRNA and splicing activity as well as ribosome stability.&lt;br /&gt;For the regulation of tRNA activity, we conceived a comparable  gain of function  mechanism as used in the mRNA context: We integrated essential elements of the tRNA in stem I of the HHR thereby destroying the typical tRNA cloverleaf structure. The new fold is not recognized anymore by essential tRNA processing enzymes leaving this tRNA to be inoperative in translation. By self-cleavage, however, the original tRNA fold is rescued and the tRNA can be eventually used in translation. Ligand-controlled tRNA activity was achieved by transferring the mRNA-based theophylline-dependent aptazyme to this new setup hence again proofing the generalizable use of RNA elements once identified.&lt;br /&gt;In order to render ribosome stability small molecule-dependent, we simply inserted a TPP-dependent aptazyme in helix 6 of the 16 S rRNA. Interestingly, the HHR scaffold inserted at this position did not interfere with ribosome activity in vivo, while self-cleavage almost completely inactivated it. By an in vivo screening, we identified once more TPP-dependent aptazyme variants which are either inducing or inhibiting catalytic activity. One of the identified variants featured the identical connection sequence as a variant origination from the mRNA context. Again, this is a very impressive example for the compatibility of RNA domains inserted in different surroundings as well as a validation for the screening method itself. In future, these aptazyme-dependent ribosome variants could be used to construct artificial gene networks in which expression levels of several genes have to be controlled simultaneously. Moreover, it might represent an interesting tool for in vitro and in vivo characterization of 16 S rRNA folding.&lt;br /&gt;Finally, we were also able to control group I splicing activity in E. coli in a comparable way as already shown with the 16 S rRNA by inserting the HHR into helix 10 of the Tetrahymena thermophila intron. While the ribozyme scaffold itself did not interfere with splicing activity, HHR self-cleavage had a strong effect on splicing-activity.&lt;br /&gt;As a conclusion of this thesis, we have shown that the Hammerhead ribozyme represents a very powerful and versatile tool for the artificial regulation of gene expression in E. coli. The constructed switches follow a rationally-designed and protein-independent mechanism and the developed RNA parts are highly interchangeable between several surroundings (mRNA, tRNA, and rRNA). Moreover, it has been show that at least the theophylline-dependent HHAz can be also transferred to eukaryotic systems while retaining its switching properties (Master thesis of Patrick Ketzer and Simon Ausländer and).&lt;br /&gt;For synthetic biology, it would be very appealing to combine several of these switches in order to construct genetic circuits. Our lab has recently shown, that it is possible to combine several of the here presented switches in one system in order to design complex logic gates. Considering the small size of ribozyme-based compared to the protein-based switches, the use of the RNA parts might be advantageous.</dcterms:abstract>
    <dc:rights>terms-of-use</dc:rights>
    <dc:contributor>Wieland, Markus</dc:contributor>
    <dc:date rdf:datatype="http://www.w3.org/2001/XMLSchema#dateTime">2011-03-24T18:13:38Z</dc:date>
    <dcterms:hasPart rdf:resource="https://kops.uni-konstanz.de/bitstream/123456789/9677/1/Markus_Wieland_Dissertation.pdf"/>
    <dcterms:available rdf:datatype="http://www.w3.org/2001/XMLSchema#dateTime">2011-03-24T18:13:38Z</dcterms:available>
    <dc:language>deu</dc:language>
    <dcterms:isPartOf rdf:resource="https://kops.uni-konstanz.de/server/rdf/resource/123456789/29"/>
    <dcterms:issued>2010</dcterms:issued>
    <void:sparqlEndpoint rdf:resource="http://localhost/fuseki/dspace/sparql"/>
    <dcterms:rights rdf:resource="https://rightsstatements.org/page/InC/1.0/"/>
    <foaf:homepage rdf:resource="http://localhost:8080/"/>
    <dc:format>application/pdf</dc:format>
  </rdf:Description>
</rdf:RDF>
Interner Vermerk
xmlui.Submission.submit.DescribeStep.inputForms.label.kops_note_fromSubmitter
Kontakt
URL der Originalveröffentl.
Prüfdatum der URL
Prüfungsdatum der Dissertation
May 7, 2010
Finanzierungsart
Kommentar zur Publikation
Allianzlizenz
Corresponding Authors der Uni Konstanz vorhanden
Internationale Co-Autor:innen
Universitätsbibliographie
Begutachtet