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Aboveground herbivory can promote exotic plant invasion through intra- and interspecific aboveground–belowground interactions

Aboveground herbivory can promote exotic plant invasion through intra- and interspecific aboveground–belowground interactions

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GAO, Lunlun, Chunqiang WEI, Yifan HE, Xuefei TANG, Wei CHEN, Hao XU, Yuqing WU, Rutger A. WILSCHUT, Xinmin LU, 2022. Aboveground herbivory can promote exotic plant invasion through intra- and interspecific aboveground–belowground interactions. In: New Phytologist. Wiley-Blackwell. ISSN 0028-646X. eISSN 1469-8137. Available under: doi: 10.1111/nph.18520

@article{Gao2022-10-05Above-59185, title={Aboveground herbivory can promote exotic plant invasion through intra- and interspecific aboveground–belowground interactions}, year={2022}, doi={10.1111/nph.18520}, issn={0028-646X}, journal={New Phytologist}, author={Gao, Lunlun and Wei, Chunqiang and He, Yifan and Tang, Xuefei and Chen, Wei and Xu, Hao and Wu, Yuqing and Wilschut, Rutger A. and Lu, Xinmin} }

Wilschut, Rutger A. He, Yifan Chen, Wei 2022-10-05 Wilschut, Rutger A. Aboveground herbivory can promote exotic plant invasion through intra- and interspecific aboveground–belowground interactions Lu, Xinmin Aboveground herbivores and soil biota profoundly affect plant invasions. However, how they interactively affect plant invasions through plant–soil feedbacks (PSFs) remains unclear.<br /><br />To explore how herbivory by the introduced beetle Agasicles hygrophila affects Alternanthera philoxeroides invasions in China, we integrated multiyear field surveys and a 2-yr PSF experiment, in which we examined how herbivory affects PSFs on the performance of native and invasive plants and the introduced beetles.<br /><br />Despite increased herbivory from A. hygrophila, A. philoxeroides dominance over co-occurring congeneric native Alternanthera sessilis remained constant from 2014 to 2019. While occurring at lower abundances, A. sessilis experienced similar herbivore damage, suggesting apparent competitive effects. Our experiments revealed that herbivory on A. philoxeroides altered soil microbial communities, prolonged its negative PSF on A. sessilis, and decreased A. hygrophila larvae performance on the next-generation invasive plants. Consequently, A. hygrophila larvae performed better on leaves of natives than those of invasives when grown in soils conditioned by invasive plants defoliated by the introduced beetles.<br /><br />Our findings suggest that aboveground herbivory might promote rather than suppress A. philoxeroides invasion by enhancing its soil-mediated self-reinforcement, providing a novel mechanistic understanding of plant invasions. These findings highlight the need to incorporate an aboveground–belowground perspective during the assessment of potential biocontrol agents. Lu, Xinmin Wei, Chunqiang Chen, Wei Wu, Yuqing Gao, Lunlun Tang, Xuefei Xu, Hao Wu, Yuqing Wei, Chunqiang Gao, Lunlun He, Yifan Tang, Xuefei Xu, Hao 2022-11-18T08:32:49Z eng 2022-11-18T08:32:49Z

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