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Head-tracking of freely-behaving pigeons in a motion-capture system reveals the selective use of visual field regions

Head-tracking of freely-behaving pigeons in a motion-capture system reveals the selective use of visual field regions

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KANO, Fumihiro, Hemal NAIK, Göksel KESKIN, Iain D. COUZIN, Máté NAGY, 2022. Head-tracking of freely-behaving pigeons in a motion-capture system reveals the selective use of visual field regions. In: Scientific Reports. Springer Nature. 12(1), 19113. eISSN 2045-2322. Available under: doi: 10.1038/s41598-022-21931-9

@article{Kano2022-11-09Headt-59163, title={Head-tracking of freely-behaving pigeons in a motion-capture system reveals the selective use of visual field regions}, year={2022}, doi={10.1038/s41598-022-21931-9}, number={1}, volume={12}, journal={Scientific Reports}, author={Kano, Fumihiro and Naik, Hemal and Keskin, Göksel and Couzin, Iain D. and Nagy, Máté}, note={Article Number: 19113} }

2022-11-09 2022-11-16T08:12:53Z Couzin, Iain D. Head-tracking of freely-behaving pigeons in a motion-capture system reveals the selective use of visual field regions Naik, Hemal Nagy, Máté eng Kano, Fumihiro Couzin, Iain D. Keskin, Göksel Naik, Hemal Nagy, Máté 2022-11-16T08:12:53Z Kano, Fumihiro Attribution 4.0 International Keskin, Göksel Using a motion-capture system and custom head-calibration methods, we reconstructed the head-centric view of freely behaving pigeons and examined how they orient their head when presented with various types of attention-getting objects at various relative locations. Pigeons predominantly employed their retinal specializations to view a visual target, namely their foveas projecting laterally (at an azimuth of ± 75°) into the horizon, and their visually-sensitive "red areas" projecting broadly into the lower-frontal visual field. Pigeons used their foveas to view any distant object while they used their red areas to view a nearby object on the ground (< 50 cm). Pigeons "fixated" a visual target with their foveas; the intervals between head-saccades were longer when the visual target was viewed by birds' foveas compared to when it was viewed by any other region. Furthermore, pigeons showed a weak preference to use their right eye to examine small objects distinctive in detailed features and their left eye to view threat-related or social stimuli. Despite the known difficulty in identifying where a bird is attending, we show that it is possible to estimate the visual attention of freely-behaving birds by tracking the projections of their retinal specializations in their visual field with cutting-edge methods.

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