KOPS - The Institutional Repository of the University of Konstanz

Endurance Trained Athletes Do Not per se Have Higher Hoffmann Reflexes Than Recreationally Active Controls

Endurance Trained Athletes Do Not per se Have Higher Hoffmann Reflexes Than Recreationally Active Controls

Cite This

Files in this item

Checksum: MD5:68d41b1c571770354014cf19e95d24ec

BERTSCHINGER, Raphael, Louis-Solal GIBOIN, Markus GRUBER, 2021. Endurance Trained Athletes Do Not per se Have Higher Hoffmann Reflexes Than Recreationally Active Controls. In: Frontiers in Physiology. Frontiers Research Foundation. 12, 736067. eISSN 1664-042X. Available under: doi: 10.3389/fphys.2021.736067

@article{Bertschinger2021Endur-55782, title={Endurance Trained Athletes Do Not per se Have Higher Hoffmann Reflexes Than Recreationally Active Controls}, year={2021}, doi={10.3389/fphys.2021.736067}, volume={12}, journal={Frontiers in Physiology}, author={Bertschinger, Raphael and Giboin, Louis-Solal and Gruber, Markus}, note={Article Number: 736067} }

eng Gruber, Markus Bertschinger, Raphael Giboin, Louis-Solal Giboin, Louis-Solal Endurance Trained Athletes Do Not per se Have Higher Hoffmann Reflexes Than Recreationally Active Controls 2021 2021-12-07T15:28:53Z The impact of endurance training on spinal neural circuitries remains largely unknown. Some studies have reported higher H-reflexes in endurance trained athletes and therefore, adaptations within the Ia afferent pathways after long term endurance training have been suggested. In the present study we tested the hypothesis that cyclists (n = 12) demonstrate higher Hoffmann reflexes (H-reflexes) compared to recreationally active controls (n = 10). Notwithstanding, highly significant differences in endurance performance (VO<sub>2peak</sub>: 60.6 for cyclists vs. 46.3 ml/min/kg for controls (p < 0.001) there was no difference in the size of the SOL H-reflex between cyclists and controls (H<sub>max</sub>/M<sub>max</sub> ratio 61.3 vs. 60.0%, respectively (p = 0.840). Further analyses of the H and M recruitment curves for SOL revealed a significant steeper slope of the M recruitment curve in the group of cyclists (76.2 ± 3.8° vs. 72.0 ± 4.4°, p = 0.046) without a difference in the H-recruitment curve (84.6 ± 3.0° vs. 85.0 ± 2.8°, p = 0.784) compared to the control group. Cycling is classified as an endurance sport and thus the findings of the present study do not further support the assumption that long-term aerobic training leads to a general increase of the H-reflex. Amongst methodological differences in assessing the H-reflex, the training-specific sensorimotor control of the endurance sport itself might differently affect the responsiveness of spinal motoneurons on Ia-afferent inputs. Bertschinger, Raphael Attribution 4.0 International 2021-12-07T15:28:53Z Gruber, Markus

Downloads since Dec 7, 2021 (Information about access statistics)

Bertschinger_2-1d0gssp0vrn8k1.pdf 71

This item appears in the following Collection(s)

Attribution 4.0 International Except where otherwise noted, this item's license is described as Attribution 4.0 International

Search KOPS


Browse

My Account