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Faced with one's fear : Attentional bias in anorexia nervosa and healthy individuals upon confrontation with an obese body stimulus in an eye-tracking paradigm

Faced with one's fear : Attentional bias in anorexia nervosa and healthy individuals upon confrontation with an obese body stimulus in an eye-tracking paradigm

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HARTMANN, Andrea Sabrina, Tiana BORGERS, Jennifer Joanne THOMAS, Claire-Marie GIABBICONI, Silja VOCKS, 2020. Faced with one's fear : Attentional bias in anorexia nervosa and healthy individuals upon confrontation with an obese body stimulus in an eye-tracking paradigm. In: Brain and Behavior. Wiley Open Access. 10(11), e01834. eISSN 2162-3279. Available under: doi: 10.1002/brb3.1834

@article{Hartmann2020Faced-55264, title={Faced with one's fear : Attentional bias in anorexia nervosa and healthy individuals upon confrontation with an obese body stimulus in an eye-tracking paradigm}, year={2020}, doi={10.1002/brb3.1834}, number={11}, volume={10}, journal={Brain and Behavior}, author={Hartmann, Andrea Sabrina and Borgers, Tiana and Thomas, Jennifer Joanne and Giabbiconi, Claire-Marie and Vocks, Silja}, note={Article Number: e01834} }

2020 2021-10-15T10:59:13Z Hartmann, Andrea Sabrina Attribution 4.0 International Giabbiconi, Claire-Marie Faced with one's fear : Attentional bias in anorexia nervosa and healthy individuals upon confrontation with an obese body stimulus in an eye-tracking paradigm Thomas, Jennifer Joanne 2021-10-15T10:59:13Z Giabbiconi, Claire-Marie Hartmann, Andrea Sabrina Vocks, Silja Objectives<br />Cognitive biases, particularly attentional biases, have been shown to be central to anorexia nervosa (AN). This study looked at attention deployment when consecutively viewing an obese and own body stimulus that both might represent feared stimuli in AN.<br /><br />Methods<br />Individuals with AN (n = 26) and mentally healthy controls (MHCs; n = 16) viewed a picture of themselves and a standardized computer-generated obese body in random order for 4,000 ms each and then rated the attractiveness of the body parts of both stimuli. We compared dwell times on subjectively unattractive versus attractive body parts, and body parts that show weight status and gain most strongly (stomach, hips, thighs) versus least strongly.<br /><br />Results<br />For both stimuli, participants focused longer on the subjectively unattractive body parts (p < .01 and .001), with an even stronger attentional bias in individuals with AN regarding the obese stimulus (p < .05). Both groups also gazed longer at body parts indicative of weight status or gain (both stimuli p < .001), with no group differences.<br /><br />Conclusions<br />The attentional bias to one's own subjectively unattractive body parts might represent a mechanism maintaining body image disturbance in women in general. This attentional bias is even stronger when women with AN are confronted with an obese stimulus, highlighting a potential mental preoccupation with being fat or weight gain and a behavior distinct for the disorder. Borgers, Tiana Borgers, Tiana Thomas, Jennifer Joanne eng Vocks, Silja

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