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Influence of Lhcx proteins on acclimation to dynamic light and low iron conditions in the diatom Phaeodactylum tricornutum

Influence of Lhcx proteins on acclimation to dynamic light and low iron conditions in the diatom Phaeodactylum tricornutum

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BUCK, Jochen Mario, 2020. Influence of Lhcx proteins on acclimation to dynamic light and low iron conditions in the diatom Phaeodactylum tricornutum [Dissertation]. Konstanz: University of Konstanz

@phdthesis{Buck2020Influ-54041, title={Influence of Lhcx proteins on acclimation to dynamic light and low iron conditions in the diatom Phaeodactylum tricornutum}, year={2020}, author={Buck, Jochen Mario}, address={Konstanz}, school={Universität Konstanz} }

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