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Work-related social support modulates effects of early life stress on limbic reactivity during stress

Work-related social support modulates effects of early life stress on limbic reactivity during stress

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LEICHT-DEOBALD, Ulrich, Heike BRUCH, Luisa BÖNKE, Amie STEVENSE, Yan FAN, Malek BAJBOUJ, Simone GRIMM, 2018. Work-related social support modulates effects of early life stress on limbic reactivity during stress. In: Brain Imaging and Behavior. Springer. 12(5), pp. 1405-1418. ISSN 1931-7557. eISSN 1931-7565. Available under: doi: 10.1007/s11682-017-9810-z

@article{LeichtDeobald2018-10Workr-52878, title={Work-related social support modulates effects of early life stress on limbic reactivity during stress}, year={2018}, doi={10.1007/s11682-017-9810-z}, number={5}, volume={12}, issn={1931-7557}, journal={Brain Imaging and Behavior}, pages={1405--1418}, author={Leicht-Deobald, Ulrich and Bruch, Heike and Bönke, Luisa and Stevense, Amie and Fan, Yan and Bajbouj, Malek and Grimm, Simone} }

<rdf:RDF xmlns:dcterms="http://purl.org/dc/terms/" xmlns:dc="http://purl.org/dc/elements/1.1/" xmlns:rdf="http://www.w3.org/1999/02/22-rdf-syntax-ns#" xmlns:bibo="http://purl.org/ontology/bibo/" xmlns:dspace="http://digital-repositories.org/ontologies/dspace/0.1.0#" xmlns:foaf="http://xmlns.com/foaf/0.1/" xmlns:void="http://rdfs.org/ns/void#" xmlns:xsd="http://www.w3.org/2001/XMLSchema#" > <rdf:Description rdf:about="https://kops.uni-konstanz.de/rdf/resource/123456789/52878"> <dc:contributor>Fan, Yan</dc:contributor> <bibo:uri rdf:resource="https://kops.uni-konstanz.de/handle/123456789/52878"/> <dcterms:available rdf:datatype="http://www.w3.org/2001/XMLSchema#dateTime">2021-02-17T12:21:33Z</dcterms:available> <dc:contributor>Grimm, Simone</dc:contributor> <dcterms:title>Work-related social support modulates effects of early life stress on limbic reactivity during stress</dcterms:title> <dc:creator>Bajbouj, Malek</dc:creator> <dc:creator>Stevense, Amie</dc:creator> <dcterms:isPartOf rdf:resource="https://kops.uni-konstanz.de/rdf/resource/123456789/42"/> <dc:language>eng</dc:language> <dc:rights>terms-of-use</dc:rights> <dc:contributor>Stevense, Amie</dc:contributor> <dc:creator>Leicht-Deobald, Ulrich</dc:creator> <dc:contributor>Leicht-Deobald, Ulrich</dc:contributor> <dc:creator>Grimm, Simone</dc:creator> <dc:contributor>Bajbouj, Malek</dc:contributor> <dc:date rdf:datatype="http://www.w3.org/2001/XMLSchema#dateTime">2021-02-17T12:21:33Z</dc:date> <dspace:isPartOfCollection rdf:resource="https://kops.uni-konstanz.de/rdf/resource/123456789/42"/> <dc:creator>Fan, Yan</dc:creator> <dcterms:rights rdf:resource="https://rightsstatements.org/page/InC/1.0/"/> <dcterms:issued>2018-10</dcterms:issued> <void:sparqlEndpoint rdf:resource="http://localhost/fuseki/dspace/sparql"/> <foaf:homepage rdf:resource="http://localhost:8080/jspui"/> <dcterms:abstract xml:lang="eng">Early life stress (ELS) affects stress- reactivity via limbic brain regions implicated such as hippocampus and amygdala. Social support is a major protective factor against ELS effects, while subjects with ELS experience reportedly perceive less of it in their daily life. The workplace, where most adults spend a substantial amount of time in their daily lives, might serve as a major resource for social support. Since previous data demonstrated that social support attenuates stress reactivity, we here used a psychosocial stress task to test the hypothesis that work-related social support modulates the effects of ELS. Results show decreased amygdala reactivity during stress in ELS subjects who report high levels of work- related social support, thereby indicating a signature for reduced stress reactivity. However, this effect was only observable on the neural, but not on the behavioral level, since social support had no buffering effect regarding the subjective experience of stress in daily life as well as regarding feelings of uncontrollability induced by the stress task. Accordingly, our data suggest that subjects with ELS experiences might benefit from interventions targeted at lowering their subjective stress levels by helping them to better perceive the availability of social support in their daily lives.</dcterms:abstract> <dc:contributor>Bönke, Luisa</dc:contributor> <dc:creator>Bruch, Heike</dc:creator> <dc:contributor>Bruch, Heike</dc:contributor> <dc:creator>Bönke, Luisa</dc:creator> </rdf:Description> </rdf:RDF>

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