When and why politicians do not keep their welfare promises

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HORN, Alexander, Carsten JENSEN, 2017. When and why politicians do not keep their welfare promises. In: European Journal of Political Research. Wiley. 56(2), pp. 381-400. ISSN 0304-4130. eISSN 1475-6765. Available under: doi: 10.1111/1475-6765.12173

@article{Horn2017-05polit-50840, title={When and why politicians do not keep their welfare promises}, year={2017}, doi={10.1111/1475-6765.12173}, number={2}, volume={56}, issn={0304-4130}, journal={European Journal of Political Research}, pages={381--400}, author={Horn, Alexander and Jensen, Carsten} }

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