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Microbial community composition of deep-sea corals from the Red Sea provides insight into functional adaption to a unique environment

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Microbial community composition of deep-sea corals from the Red Sea provides insight into functional adaption to a unique environment

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RÖTHIG, Till, Lauren K. YUM, Stephan G. KREMB, Anna ROIK, Christian R. VOOLSTRA, 2017. Microbial community composition of deep-sea corals from the Red Sea provides insight into functional adaption to a unique environment. In: Scientific Reports. Springer Nature. 7, 44714. eISSN 2045-2322. Available under: doi: 10.1038/srep44714

@article{Rothig2017Micro-50750, title={Microbial community composition of deep-sea corals from the Red Sea provides insight into functional adaption to a unique environment}, year={2017}, doi={10.1038/srep44714}, volume={7}, journal={Scientific Reports}, author={Röthig, Till and Yum, Lauren K. and Kremb, Stephan G. and Roik, Anna and Voolstra, Christian R.}, note={Article Number: 44714} }

Röthig, Till Kremb, Stephan G. Roik, Anna Röthig, Till 2017 Microbial community composition of deep-sea corals from the Red Sea provides insight into functional adaption to a unique environment Yum, Lauren K. Attribution 4.0 International 2020-09-09T13:28:55Z 2020-09-09T13:28:55Z eng Roik, Anna Voolstra, Christian R. Microbes associated with deep-sea corals remain poorly studied. The lack of symbiotic algae suggests that associated microbes may play a fundamental role in maintaining a viable coral host via acquisition and recycling of nutrients. Here we employed 16 S rRNA gene sequencing to study bacterial communities of three deep-sea scleractinian corals from the Red Sea, Dendrophyllia sp., Eguchipsammia fistula, and Rhizotrochus typus. We found diverse, species-specific microbiomes, distinct from the surrounding seawater. Microbiomes were comprised of few abundant bacteria, which constituted the majority of sequences (up to 58% depending on the coral species). In addition, we found a high diversity of rare bacteria (taxa at <1% abundance comprised >90% of all bacteria). Interestingly, we identified anaerobic bacteria, potentially providing metabolic functions at low oxygen conditions, as well as bacteria harboring the potential to degrade crude oil components. Considering the presence of oil and gas fields in the Red Sea, these bacteria may unlock this carbon source for the coral host. In conclusion, the prevailing environmental conditions of the deep Red Sea (>20 °C, <2 mg oxygen L<sup>-1</sup>) may require distinct functional adaptations, and our data suggest that bacterial communities may contribute to coral functioning in this challenging environment. Yum, Lauren K. Kremb, Stephan G. Voolstra, Christian R.

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