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Avian species richness and abundance at Lake Constance : diverging long-term trends in Passerines and Nonpasserines

Avian species richness and abundance at Lake Constance : diverging long-term trends in Passerines and Nonpasserines

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BAUER, Hans-Günther, Nicole LEMOINE, Markus PEINTINGER, 2008. Avian species richness and abundance at Lake Constance : diverging long-term trends in Passerines and Nonpasserines. In: Journal of Ornithology. Springer. 149(2), pp. 217-222. ISSN 2193-7192. eISSN 2193-7206. Available under: doi: 10.1007/s10336-007-0262-x

@article{Bauer2008-04Avian-50191, title={Avian species richness and abundance at Lake Constance : diverging long-term trends in Passerines and Nonpasserines}, year={2008}, doi={10.1007/s10336-007-0262-x}, number={2}, volume={149}, issn={2193-7192}, journal={Journal of Ornithology}, pages={217--222}, author={Bauer, Hans-Günther and Lemoine, Nicole and Peintinger, Markus} }

2020-07-09T11:47:04Z Bauer, Hans-Günther In Central Europe, massive losses in species richness of breeding birds have been documented in the last decades, but the question arises whether species richness is currently still decreasing or again increasing due to conservation efforts. In this study, we investigated regional and local species richness as well as mean number of breeding pairs and mean biomass per tetrad over a period of some 20 years at Lake Constance. Three quantitative censuses of 303 tetrads (2 × 2 km<sup>2</sup>) repeated at 10-year intervals (1980–1981, 1990–1992, 2000–2002) revealed an increase in regional species richness (total number of breeding species). At the same time, however, a strong decline in local species richness (number of breeding species per tetrad), number of breeding pairs, and estimated biomass were observed. Changes of species richness differed markedly between Nonpasserine and Passerine birds. Whereas species richness of Nonpasserines remained constant from 1980 to 1990, and even increased between 1990 and 2000, that of Passerines decreased in both periods. This indicates that effects of conservation efforts apparently eclipse more general effects of climate and habitat change in Nonpasserines. The massive abundance and biomass losses observed in formerly common Passerine species are not compensated by gains in populations of Nonpasserine species. The results of the three bird censuses at Lake Constance imply that ongoing habitat degradation and human impacts as well as increasing effects of climate change are the main drivers of the observed population changes. Avian species richness and abundance at Lake Constance : diverging long-term trends in Passerines and Nonpasserines terms-of-use Peintinger, Markus 2020-07-09T11:47:04Z Bauer, Hans-Günther 2008-04 Peintinger, Markus Lemoine, Nicole Lemoine, Nicole eng

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