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The structure of fish follower-feeding associations at three oceanic islands in southwestern Atlantic

The structure of fish follower-feeding associations at three oceanic islands in southwestern Atlantic

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INAGAKI, Kelly Y., Thiago C. MENDES, Juan P. QUIMBAYO, Mauricio CANTOR, Ivan SAZIMA, 2020. The structure of fish follower-feeding associations at three oceanic islands in southwestern Atlantic. In: Environmental Biology of Fishes. Springer. 103(1), pp. 1-11. ISSN 0378-1909. eISSN 1573-5133. Available under: doi: 10.1007/s10641-019-00924-0

@article{Inagaki2020-01struc-50130, title={The structure of fish follower-feeding associations at three oceanic islands in southwestern Atlantic}, year={2020}, doi={10.1007/s10641-019-00924-0}, number={1}, volume={103}, issn={0378-1909}, journal={Environmental Biology of Fishes}, pages={1--11}, author={Inagaki, Kelly Y. and Mendes, Thiago C. and Quimbayo, Juan P. and Cantor, Mauricio and Sazima, Ivan} }

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