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Inclusive classroom norms, children's sympathy, and intended inclusion toward students with hyperactive behavior

Inclusive classroom norms, children's sympathy, and intended inclusion toward students with hyperactive behavior

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GASSER, Luciano, Jeanine GRÜTTER, Loredana TORCHETTI, 2018. Inclusive classroom norms, children's sympathy, and intended inclusion toward students with hyperactive behavior. In: Journal of School Psychology. Elsevier. 71, pp. 72-84. ISSN 0022-4405. eISSN 1873-3506. Available under: doi: 10.1016/j.jsp.2018.10.005

@article{Gasser2018Inclu-49838, title={Inclusive classroom norms, children's sympathy, and intended inclusion toward students with hyperactive behavior}, year={2018}, doi={10.1016/j.jsp.2018.10.005}, volume={71}, issn={0022-4405}, journal={Journal of School Psychology}, pages={72--84}, author={Gasser, Luciano and Grütter, Jeanine and Torchetti, Loredana} }

Grütter, Jeanine Inclusive classroom norms, children's sympathy, and intended inclusion toward students with hyperactive behavior As the classroom represents an important social context for the development of out-group attitudes, the current study investigated the role of inclusive classroom norms for students' attitudes toward hyperactive peers. The study included 1209 Swiss children from 61 school classes who were surveyed in the fifth grade (T1) and in the sixth grade (T2) (M<sub>ageT1</sub> = 11.55 years, M<sub>ageT2</sub> = 12.58 years). Students' attitudes toward hyperactive children was assessed by self-reports on students' sympathy and intended inclusion toward hypothetical children who show hyperactive behavior. Moreover, students rated their classmates' inclusive attitudes. Analyses with an autoregressive multilevel path model revealed that inclusive classrooms norms in the fifth grade predicted students' sympathy and intended inclusion toward hyperactive children in the sixth grade. The results implicate that group-level analyses are important in order to explain hyperactive children's peer group problems. Torchetti, Loredana Grütter, Jeanine 2020-06-15T13:43:16Z 2020-06-15T13:43:16Z 2018 terms-of-use Torchetti, Loredana Gasser, Luciano eng Gasser, Luciano

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