Journal article:
The cycle of violence as a function of PTSD and appetitive aggression : A longitudinal study with Burundian soldiers

No Thumbnail Available
Date
September 2020
Editors
Bambonye, Manassé
Pryss, Rüdiger
Schobel, Johannes
Weierstall‐Pust, Roland
relationships.isEditorOf
Contact
Journal ISSN
Electronic ISSN
ISBN
Bibliographical data
Publisher
Series
DOI (citable link)
ArXiv-ID
International patent number
Link to the license
Project
323977
EU project number
Open Access publication
Collections
Restricted until
Title in another language
Research Projects
Organizational Units
Journal Issue
Publication type
Journal article
Publication status
Published
Abstract
During deployment, soldiers face situations in which they are not only exposed to violence but also have to perpetrate it themselves. This study investigates the role of soldiers' levels of posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD) symptoms and appetitive aggression, that is, a lust for violence, for their engaging in violence during deployment. Furthermore, factors during deployment influencing the level of PTSD symptoms and appetitive aggression after deployment were examined for a better comprehension of the maintenance of violence. Semi‐structured interviews were conducted with 468 Burundian soldiers before and after a 1‐year deployment to Somalia. To predict violent acts during deployment (perideployment) as well as appetitive aggression and PTSD symptom severity after deployment (postdeployment), structural equation modeling was utilized. Results showed that the number of violent acts perideployment was predicted by the level of appetitive aggression and by the severity of PTSD hyperarousal symptoms predeployment. In addition to its association with the predeployment level, appetitive aggression postdeployment was predicted by violent acts and trauma exposure perideployment as well as positively associated with unit support. PTSD symptom severity postdeployment was predicted by the severity of PTSD avoidance symptoms predeployment and trauma exposure perideployment, and negatively associated with unit support. This prospective study reveals the importance of appetitive aggression and PTSD hyperarousal symptoms for the engagement in violent acts during deployment, while simultaneously demonstrating how these phenomena may develop in mutually reinforcing cycles in a war setting.
Summary in another language
Subject (DDC)
150 Psychology
Keywords
aggression, deployment, PTSD, soldiers, violence
Published in
Aggressive Behavior ; 46 (2020), 5. - pp. 391-399. - Wiley. - ISSN 0096-140X. - eISSN 1098-2337
Conference
Review
undefined / . - undefined, undefined. - (undefined; undefined)
Cite This
ISO 690NANDI, Corina, Anselm CROMBACH, Thomas ELBERT, Manassé BAMBONYE, Rüdiger PRYSS, Johannes SCHOBEL, Roland WEIERSTALL‐PUST, 2020. The cycle of violence as a function of PTSD and appetitive aggression : A longitudinal study with Burundian soldiers. In: Aggressive Behavior. Wiley. 46(5), pp. 391-399. ISSN 0096-140X. eISSN 1098-2337. Available under: doi: 10.1002/ab.21895
BibTex
@article{Nandi2020-09cycle-49379,
  year={2020},
  doi={10.1002/ab.21895},
  title={The cycle of violence as a function of PTSD and appetitive aggression : A longitudinal study with Burundian soldiers},
  number={5},
  volume={46},
  issn={0096-140X},
  journal={Aggressive Behavior},
  pages={391--399},
  author={Nandi, Corina and Crombach, Anselm and Elbert, Thomas and Bambonye, Manassé and Pryss, Rüdiger and Schobel, Johannes and Weierstall‐Pust, Roland}
}
RDF
<rdf:RDF
    xmlns:dcterms="http://purl.org/dc/terms/"
    xmlns:dc="http://purl.org/dc/elements/1.1/"
    xmlns:rdf="http://www.w3.org/1999/02/22-rdf-syntax-ns#"
    xmlns:bibo="http://purl.org/ontology/bibo/"
    xmlns:dspace="http://digital-repositories.org/ontologies/dspace/0.1.0#"
    xmlns:foaf="http://xmlns.com/foaf/0.1/"
    xmlns:void="http://rdfs.org/ns/void#"
    xmlns:xsd="http://www.w3.org/2001/XMLSchema#" > 
  <rdf:Description rdf:about="https://kops.uni-konstanz.de/server/rdf/resource/123456789/49379">
    <dc:creator>Nandi, Corina</dc:creator>
    <dc:contributor>Bambonye, Manassé</dc:contributor>
    <dc:contributor>Nandi, Corina</dc:contributor>
    <dc:contributor>Pryss, Rüdiger</dc:contributor>
    <foaf:homepage rdf:resource="http://localhost:8080/"/>
    <dspace:isPartOfCollection rdf:resource="https://kops.uni-konstanz.de/server/rdf/resource/123456789/43"/>
    <dcterms:hasPart rdf:resource="https://kops.uni-konstanz.de/bitstream/123456789/49379/1/Nandi_2-22msonni35v59.pdf"/>
    <dc:contributor>Crombach, Anselm</dc:contributor>
    <dcterms:issued>2020-09</dcterms:issued>
    <dc:creator>Pryss, Rüdiger</dc:creator>
    <dc:date rdf:datatype="http://www.w3.org/2001/XMLSchema#dateTime">2020-05-04T13:10:00Z</dc:date>
    <dc:language>eng</dc:language>
    <dc:contributor>Elbert, Thomas</dc:contributor>
    <dcterms:isPartOf rdf:resource="https://kops.uni-konstanz.de/server/rdf/resource/123456789/43"/>
    <dc:contributor>Schobel, Johannes</dc:contributor>
    <dcterms:title>The cycle of violence as a function of PTSD and appetitive aggression : A longitudinal study with Burundian soldiers</dcterms:title>
    <dspace:hasBitstream rdf:resource="https://kops.uni-konstanz.de/bitstream/123456789/49379/1/Nandi_2-22msonni35v59.pdf"/>
    <dc:contributor>Weierstall‐Pust, Roland</dc:contributor>
    <bibo:uri rdf:resource="https://kops.uni-konstanz.de/handle/123456789/49379"/>
    <dc:creator>Schobel, Johannes</dc:creator>
    <dcterms:available rdf:datatype="http://www.w3.org/2001/XMLSchema#dateTime">2020-05-04T13:10:00Z</dcterms:available>
    <dc:rights>Attribution 4.0 International</dc:rights>
    <dcterms:rights rdf:resource="http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/"/>
    <dc:creator>Weierstall‐Pust, Roland</dc:creator>
    <void:sparqlEndpoint rdf:resource="http://localhost/fuseki/dspace/sparql"/>
    <dc:creator>Bambonye, Manassé</dc:creator>
    <dc:creator>Elbert, Thomas</dc:creator>
    <dcterms:abstract xml:lang="eng">During deployment, soldiers face situations in which they are not only exposed to violence but also have to perpetrate it themselves. This study investigates the role of soldiers' levels of posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD) symptoms and appetitive aggression, that is, a lust for violence, for their engaging in violence during deployment. Furthermore, factors during deployment influencing the level of PTSD symptoms and appetitive aggression after deployment were examined for a better comprehension of the maintenance of violence. Semi‐structured interviews were conducted with 468 Burundian soldiers before and after a 1‐year deployment to Somalia. To predict violent acts during deployment (perideployment) as well as appetitive aggression and PTSD symptom severity after deployment (postdeployment), structural equation modeling was utilized. Results showed that the number of violent acts perideployment was predicted by the level of appetitive aggression and by the severity of PTSD hyperarousal symptoms predeployment. In addition to its association with the predeployment level, appetitive aggression postdeployment was predicted by violent acts and trauma exposure perideployment as well as positively associated with unit support. PTSD symptom severity postdeployment was predicted by the severity of PTSD avoidance symptoms predeployment and trauma exposure perideployment, and negatively associated with unit support. This prospective study reveals the importance of appetitive aggression and PTSD hyperarousal symptoms for the engagement in violent acts during deployment, while simultaneously demonstrating how these phenomena may develop in mutually reinforcing cycles in a war setting.</dcterms:abstract>
    <dc:creator>Crombach, Anselm</dc:creator>
  </rdf:Description>
</rdf:RDF>
Internal note
xmlui.Submission.submit.DescribeStep.inputForms.label.kops_note_fromSubmitter
Contact
URL of original publication
Test date of URL
Examination date of dissertation
Method of financing
Comment on publication
Alliance license
Corresponding Authors der Uni Konstanz vorhanden
International Co-Authors
Bibliography of Konstanz
Yes
Refereed
Yes
Link to research data
Description of supplementary data