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Motor learning induces time dependent plasticity that is observable at the spinal cord level

Motor learning induces time dependent plasticity that is observable at the spinal cord level

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GIBOIN, Louis-Solal, Craig TOKUNO, Andreas KRAMER, Mélanie HENRY, Markus GRUBER, 2020. Motor learning induces time dependent plasticity that is observable at the spinal cord level. In: The Journal of Physiology. Wiley. 598(10), pp. 1943-1963. ISSN 0022-3751. eISSN 1469-7793. Available under: doi: 10.1113/JP278890

@article{Giboin2020-05Motor-48989, title={Motor learning induces time dependent plasticity that is observable at the spinal cord level}, year={2020}, doi={10.1113/JP278890}, number={10}, volume={598}, issn={0022-3751}, journal={The Journal of Physiology}, pages={1943--1963}, author={Giboin, Louis-Solal and Tokuno, Craig and Kramer, Andreas and Henry, Mélanie and Gruber, Markus} }

Kramer, Andreas 2020-03-10T12:23:40Z Henry, Mélanie Spinal cord plasticity is an important contributor of motor learning in humans, but its mechanisms are still poorly documented. In particular, it remains unclear whether short-term spinal adaptations are general or task-specific.<br />As a marker of neural changes that are observable at spinal level, we measured the H-reflex amplitude in the soleus muscle of 18 young healthy human adults before, immediately after (acquisition), and 24 h after (retention) the learning of a skilled task (i.e., one-legged stance on a tilt board). H-reflexes were elicited 46 ± 30 ms before touching the tilt board. Additionally, and at the same time points, we measured the H-reflex with the subject sitting at rest and while performing an unskilled and untrained task (i.e., one-legged stance on the floor).<br />After task acquisition, there was a decrease of the H-reflex amplitude measured at rest but not during the skilled or the unskilled task. At retention, there was a decrease of the H-reflex when measured during the skilled task but not during the unskilled task or at rest. Performance increase was not associated with changes in the H-reflex amplitude.<br />After the acquisition of a new skilled task, spinal changes seemed to be general (i.e., observable at rest). However, 24 h after, these changes were task-specific (i.e., observable only while performing the trained task). These results imply that skill training induces a time-dependent reorganization of the modulation of spinal networks, which possibly reflects a time-dependent optimization of the feedforward motor command. Gruber, Markus Kramer, Andreas Henry, Mélanie Attribution 4.0 International 2020-03-10T12:23:40Z Giboin, Louis-Solal Tokuno, Craig Giboin, Louis-Solal Motor learning induces time dependent plasticity that is observable at the spinal cord level Gruber, Markus Tokuno, Craig 2020-05 eng

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