KOPS - The Institutional Repository of the University of Konstanz

Exposure to family and organized violence and associated mental health in north Korean refugee youth compared to south Korean youth

Exposure to family and organized violence and associated mental health in north Korean refugee youth compared to south Korean youth

Cite This

Files in this item

Checksum: MD5:8c5bdb323442f72b1052239f35cd19b2

PARK, Jinme, Claudia CATANI, Katharin HERMENAU, Thomas ELBERT, 2019. Exposure to family and organized violence and associated mental health in north Korean refugee youth compared to south Korean youth. In: Conflict and Health. 13, 46. eISSN 1752-1505. Available under: doi: 10.1186/s13031-019-0230-0

@article{Park2019Expos-47584, title={Exposure to family and organized violence and associated mental health in north Korean refugee youth compared to south Korean youth}, year={2019}, doi={10.1186/s13031-019-0230-0}, volume={13}, journal={Conflict and Health}, author={Park, Jinme and Catani, Claudia and Hermenau, Katharin and Elbert, Thomas}, note={Article Number: 46} }

2019 Hermenau, Katharin Exposure to family and organized violence and associated mental health in north Korean refugee youth compared to south Korean youth 2019-11-21T09:29:24Z Elbert, Thomas Catani, Claudia Park, Jinme Hermenau, Katharin Elbert, Thomas Park, Jinme terms-of-use eng 2019-11-21T09:29:24Z Background:<br />Studies on populations affected by organized violence have shown elevated levels of family violence against children. This form of violence has been found to contribute to children’s psychopathology independently of traumatic experiences related to war, persecution or flight. Little is known, so far, about the exposure to family violence and its relation to mental health in North Korean refugee youth affected by political violence. The aim of this study was to examine the amount of organized and family violence and associated psychopathology in a sample of North Korean refugee youth living in South Korea compared to their South Korean peers.<br /><br />Methods:<br />Sixty-five North Korean refugee youth and 65 South Korean youth were recruited. Trained researchers conducted the survey in group meetings of five to ten participants. Using questionnaires researchers assessed traumatic experiences, family and organized violence, PTSD symptoms, depressive symptoms and other mental health problems.<br /><br />Results:<br />Higher rates of violence and trauma, and higher levels of mental health problems were found in the North Korean sample compared to the South Korean sample. Linear regression analyses including the various types of trauma as potential predictors showed that the severity of PTSD and depressive symptoms in the North Korean sample were associated with the amount of traumatic events and family violence but not with higher levels of organized violence.<br /><br />Conclusions:<br />The findings suggest that in a context of organized violence, abusive experiences by family members constitute an important problem that is strongly linked to the psychopathology of adolescents. Our data suggest that psychological treatment and prevention approaches for North Korean refugees should be carefully tailored to fit the specific requirements of this population and address the mental health of the individual as well as potential problems at the family level. Catani, Claudia

Downloads since Nov 21, 2019 (Information about access statistics)

Park_2-1fbwvm8ts7qdo6.pdf 117

This item appears in the following Collection(s)

Search KOPS


Browse

My Account