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The interplay of achievement motive-goal incongruence and state and trait self-control : a pilot study considering cortical correlates of self-control

The interplay of achievement motive-goal incongruence and state and trait self-control : a pilot study considering cortical correlates of self-control

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SCHÜLER, Julia, Jonas HOFSTETTER, Wanja WOLFF, 2019. The interplay of achievement motive-goal incongruence and state and trait self-control : a pilot study considering cortical correlates of self-control. In: Frontiers in Behavioral Neuroscience. 13, 235. eISSN 1662-5153. Available under: doi: 10.3389/fnbeh.2019.00235

@article{Schuler2019inter-47129, title={The interplay of achievement motive-goal incongruence and state and trait self-control : a pilot study considering cortical correlates of self-control}, year={2019}, doi={10.3389/fnbeh.2019.00235}, volume={13}, journal={Frontiers in Behavioral Neuroscience}, author={Schüler, Julia and Hofstetter, Jonas and Wolff, Wanja}, note={Article Number: 235} }

Schüler, Julia eng Schüler, Julia terms-of-use 2019-10-07T14:07:19Z 2019-10-07T14:07:19Z Wolff, Wanja The interplay of achievement motive-goal incongruence and state and trait self-control : a pilot study considering cortical correlates of self-control Hofstetter, Jonas 2019 Hofstetter, Jonas Objective: This study utilized different theoretical perspectives to better understand motor performance. We refered to concepts of achievement motive-goal incongruence and assessed cortical correlates of self-control. We assumed that more self-control is required when people act in conformance with an incongruent goal which, in turn, results in impaired performance. We considered the activation of a brain area associated with self-control (dorsolateral prefrontal cortex, dLPFC) as a consequence of motive-goal incongruence. Furthermore, we analyzed whether trait self-control buffers the negative effects of achievement motive—goal incongruence.<br />Method: Twenty-eight participants (17 women, mean age: 24 years), whose implicit achievement motives were assessed at the beginning of the study, performed a handgrip task in an achievement goal condition and in three incongruent conditions, while their dLPFC oxygenation was monitored continuously (using functional near-infrared spectroscopy, fNIRS).<br />Results: None of the two-way interactions (motive goal condition) reached significance. A significant three-way interaction (motive trait self-control goal condition) showed that trait self-control buffered the detrimental effects of incongruence on motor performance. The nature of the three-way interaction predicting dLPFC oxygenation was unexpected.<br />Conclusions: Although our results have to be treated with caution due to a small sample size, we see them as an encouraging starting point for further research on the interplay between motive-goal incongruence and trait and cortical correlates of state self-control that we assume to be important to understand performance in strenuous tasks. Wolff, Wanja

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