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The effects of voice content on stress reactivity : a simulation paradigm of auditory verbal hallucinations

The effects of voice content on stress reactivity : a simulation paradigm of auditory verbal hallucinations

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BAUMEISTER, David, Emmanuelle PETERS, Jens PRUESSNER, Oliver HOWES, Paul CHADWICK, 2019. The effects of voice content on stress reactivity : a simulation paradigm of auditory verbal hallucinations. In: Schizophrenia research. ISSN 0920-9964. eISSN 1573-2509. Available under: doi: 10.1016/j.schres.2019.07.019

@article{Baumeister2019-08-01effec-46643, title={The effects of voice content on stress reactivity : a simulation paradigm of auditory verbal hallucinations}, year={2019}, doi={10.1016/j.schres.2019.07.019}, issn={0920-9964}, journal={Schizophrenia research}, author={Baumeister, David and Peters, Emmanuelle and Pruessner, Jens and Howes, Oliver and Chadwick, Paul} }

Peters, Emmanuelle 2019-08-01 2019-08-07T12:02:36Z The effects of voice content on stress reactivity : a simulation paradigm of auditory verbal hallucinations Baumeister, David Peters, Emmanuelle 2019-08-07T12:02:36Z Chadwick, Paul Chadwick, Paul Pruessner, Jens Howes, Oliver Pruessner, Jens Howes, Oliver Objectives:<br />Psychosis is associated with increased subjective and altered endocrine and autonomic nervous system stress-reactivity. Psychosis patients often experience auditory verbal hallucinations, with negative voice content being particularly associated with distress. The present study developed a voice-simulation paradigm and investigated the effect of simulated voices with neutral and negative content on psychophysiological stress-reactivity, and the effect of mindful voice-appraisals on stress-reactivity.<br /><br />Method:<br />Eighty-four healthy participants completed the Montreal Imaging Stress Task with simultaneous presentation of one of three randomly allocated auditory stimuli conditions: negative voices, neutral voices or non-voice ambient sounds. Subjective stress-levels and mindful voice-appraisals were assessed using questionnaire measures, and cortisol and α-amylase levels were measured using saliva samples.<br /><br />Results:<br /><br />ANOVA revealed a significant effect of condition on subjective stress-levels (p = .002), but not cortisol (p = .63) or α-amylase (p = .73). Post-hoc analyses showed that negative voices increased subjective stress-levels relative to neutral voices (p = .002) and ambient sounds (p = .01), which did not differ from each other (p = .41). Mindful voice-appraisals were associated with less distress across conditions (p = .003), although negative voices were also associated with less mindful appraisals (p < .001).<br /><br />Conclusions:<br />Negative voice content, rather than voices or auditory stimuli per se, is linked to greater subjective but not physiological stress-reactivity. Mindful appraisals may partially moderate this effect. These findings highlight the importance of voice content for the impact of voice-hearing, and highlight the potential value of mindfulness training to treat voice distress in psychosis. eng Baumeister, David

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