From Conflict to Consensus? : Elite Integration and Democracy in Ghana

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OSEI, Anja, 2014. From Conflict to Consensus? : Elite Integration and Democracy in Ghana. In: Comparative Sociology. 13(4), pp. 503-530. ISSN 1569-1322. eISSN 1569-1330. Available under: doi: 10.1163/15691330-12341318

@article{Osei2014-10-01Confl-46571, title={From Conflict to Consensus? : Elite Integration and Democracy in Ghana}, year={2014}, doi={10.1163/15691330-12341318}, number={4}, volume={13}, issn={1569-1322}, journal={Comparative Sociology}, pages={503--530}, author={Osei, Anja} }

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