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Three months of slackline training elicit only task-specific improvements in balance performance

Three months of slackline training elicit only task-specific improvements in balance performance

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Prüfsumme: MD5:60cd8be479117b20cdfa4133fd07a3d7

GIBOIN, Louis-Solal, Markus GRUBER, Andreas KRAMER, 2018. Three months of slackline training elicit only task-specific improvements in balance performance. In: PloS ONE. 13(11), e0207542. eISSN 1932-6203. Available under: doi: 10.1371/journal.pone.0207542

@article{Giboin2018Three-44130, title={Three months of slackline training elicit only task-specific improvements in balance performance}, year={2018}, doi={10.1371/journal.pone.0207542}, number={11}, volume={13}, journal={PloS ONE}, author={Giboin, Louis-Solal and Gruber, Markus and Kramer, Andreas}, note={Article Number: e0207542} }

2018-12-04T13:51:41Z Slackline training is a challenging and motivating type of balance training, with potential usefulness for fall prevention and balance rehabilitation. However, short-term slackline training seems to elicit mostly task-specific performance improvements, reducing its potential for general fall prevention programs. It was tested whether a longer duration slackline training (three months, 2 sessions per week) would induce a transfer to untrained tasks. Balance performance was tested pre and post slackline training on the slackline used during the training, on a slackline with different slack, and in 5 different non-trained static and dynamic balance tasks (N training = 12, N control = 14). After the training, the training group increased their performance more than the control group in both of the slackline tasks, i.e. walking on the slackline (time × group interaction with p < 0.001 for both tasks). However, no differences between groups were found for the 5 non-trained balance tasks, only a main effect of time for four of them. The long-term slackline training elicited large task-specific performance improvements but no transfer to other non-trained balance tasks. The extensive slackline training that clearly enhanced slackline performance did not improve the capability to keep balance in other tasks and thus cannot be recommended as a general fall prevention program. The significant test-retest effect seen in most of the tested tasks emphasizes the need of a control group to adequately interpret changes in performance following balance training. Giboin, Louis-Solal 2018-12-04T13:51:41Z 2018 Gruber, Markus Giboin, Louis-Solal Kramer, Andreas Gruber, Markus Kramer, Andreas terms-of-use eng Three months of slackline training elicit only task-specific improvements in balance performance

Dateiabrufe seit 04.12.2018 (Informationen über die Zugriffsstatistik)

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