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Plyometrics Can Preserve Peak Power During 2 Months of Physical Inactivity : An RCT Including a One-Year Follow-Up

Plyometrics Can Preserve Peak Power During 2 Months of Physical Inactivity : An RCT Including a One-Year Follow-Up

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KRAMER, Andreas, Jakob KÜMMEL, Albert GOLLHOFER, Gabriele ARMBRECHT, Ramona RITZMANN, Daniel BELAVY, Dieter FELSENBERG, Markus GRUBER, 2018. Plyometrics Can Preserve Peak Power During 2 Months of Physical Inactivity : An RCT Including a One-Year Follow-Up. In: Frontiers in Physiology. 9, 633. eISSN 1664-042X. Available under: doi: 10.3389/fphys.2018.00633

@article{Kramer2018-05-29Plyom-42533, title={Plyometrics Can Preserve Peak Power During 2 Months of Physical Inactivity : An RCT Including a One-Year Follow-Up}, year={2018}, doi={10.3389/fphys.2018.00633}, volume={9}, journal={Frontiers in Physiology}, author={Kramer, Andreas and Kümmel, Jakob and Gollhofer, Albert and Armbrecht, Gabriele and Ritzmann, Ramona and Belavy, Daniel and Felsenberg, Dieter and Gruber, Markus}, note={Article Number: 633} }

Gruber, Markus Armbrecht, Gabriele Armbrecht, Gabriele Felsenberg, Dieter Plyometrics Can Preserve Peak Power During 2 Months of Physical Inactivity : An RCT Including a One-Year Follow-Up 2018-06-11T12:59:00Z Gollhofer, Albert 2018-06-11T12:59:00Z Belavy, Daniel Felsenberg, Dieter terms-of-use Objective: Inactivity results in a marked loss of muscle function, especially in movements requiring high power, force, and rate of force development. The aim of the present study was to evaluate if jump training can prevent these deteriorating effects of physical inactivity.<br />Methods: Performance and muscle activity during several types of jumps was assessed directly before and after 60 days of bed rest as well as during follow-up visits in 23 male participants. Participants in the jump training group (JUMP, 12 participants) trained 5–6x per week during the bed rest period in a sledge jump system that allows jumps in a horizontal position, whereas the control group (CTRL, 11 participants) did not train.<br />Results: Performance and muscle activity considerably decreased after bed rest in the control group but not in the training group, neither for countermovement jumps (peak power CTRL −31%, JUMP +0%, group × time interaction effect p < 0.001), nor for squat jumps (peak power CTRL −35%, JUMP +1%, p < 0.001) and repetitive hops (peak force CTRL −35%, JUMP −2%, p < 0.001; rate of force development CTRL −53%, JUMP +4%, p < 0.001). The control group's performance had returned to baseline 3 months after bed rest.<br />Conclusion: Despite the short exercise duration, the jump training successfully prevented power and strength losses throughout 2 months of bed rest.Thus, plyometrics can be recommended as an effective and efficient type of exercise for sedentary populations, preventing the deterioration of neuromuscular performance during physical inactivity. Kramer, Andreas Kümmel, Jakob Gruber, Markus 2018-05-29 Gollhofer, Albert eng Ritzmann, Ramona Belavy, Daniel Kümmel, Jakob Ritzmann, Ramona Kramer, Andreas

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