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Active recovery affects the recovery of the corticospinal system but not of muscle contractile properties

Active recovery affects the recovery of the corticospinal system but not of muscle contractile properties

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GIBOIN, Louis-Solal, Ehsan AMIRI, Raphael BERTSCHINGER, Markus GRUBER, 2018. Active recovery affects the recovery of the corticospinal system but not of muscle contractile properties. In: PLoS one. 13(5), e0197339. eISSN 1932-6203. Available under: doi: 10.1371/journal.pone.0197339

@article{Giboin2018Activ-42512, title={Active recovery affects the recovery of the corticospinal system but not of muscle contractile properties}, year={2018}, doi={10.1371/journal.pone.0197339}, number={5}, volume={13}, journal={PLoS one}, author={Giboin, Louis-Solal and Amiri, Ehsan and Bertschinger, Raphael and Gruber, Markus}, note={Article Number: e0197339} }

Giboin, Louis-Solal Giboin, Louis-Solal Amiri, Ehsan 2018-06-08T08:53:49Z 2018 Amiri, Ehsan Bertschinger, Raphael Gruber, Markus Bertschinger, Raphael eng Active recovery affects the recovery of the corticospinal system but not of muscle contractile properties Purpose<br />Active recovery is often used by athletes after strenuous exercise or competition but its underlying mechanisms are not well understood. We hypothesized that active recovery speeds-up recovery processes within the muscle and the central nervous system (CNS).<br /><br />Methods<br />We assessed muscular and CNS recovery by measuring the voluntary activation (VA) in the vastus lateralis muscle with transcranial magnetic stimulation (VA<sub>TMS</sub>) and peripheral nerve stimulation (VA<sub>PNS</sub>) during maximal voluntary contractions (MVC) of the knee extensors in 11 subjects. Measurements were performed before and after a fatiguing cycling time-trial, after an active and a passive recovery treatment and after another fatiguing task (1 min MVC). The measurements were performed a second time 24 h after the time-trial.<br /><br />Results<br />We observed a time × group interaction effect for VA<sub>TMS</sub> (p = 0.013). Post-hoc corrected T-tests demonstrated an increased VA<sub>TMS</sub> after active recovery when measured after the 1 min MVC performed 24 h after the time-trial (mean ± SD; 95.2 ± 4.1% vs. 89.2 ± 6.6%, p = 0.026). No significant effects were observed for all other variables.<br /><br />Conclusions<br />Active recovery increased aspects of central, rather than muscle recovery. However, no effect on MVC was seen, implying that even if active recovery speeds up CNS recovery, without affecting the recovery of muscle contractile properties, this doesn´t translate into increases in overall performance. terms-of-use Gruber, Markus 2018-06-08T08:53:49Z

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