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Organizational Learning in International Organizations : the Case of UN Peace Operations

Organizational Learning in International Organizations : the Case of UN Peace Operations

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Prüfsumme: MD5:89dbef35c2dbf856bbb998df555a11c5

BREUL, Rainer, 2005. Organizational Learning in International Organizations : the Case of UN Peace Operations [Master thesis]

@mastersthesis{Breul2005Organ-4246, title={Organizational Learning in International Organizations : the Case of UN Peace Operations}, year={2005}, author={Breul, Rainer} }

2011-03-24T10:13:13Z With the United Nations and the Bretton-Woods institutions approaching their 60th anniversary and most other IOs having been established decades ago, there is still little systematic research on how they change over time, whether they can adapt to changes in the international system, or whether and how they can learn about new problems, actors, or altering requirements for effective action. The end of the Cold War and the process of globalization with its various dimensions have fundamentally changed the organizations environment and modified the conditions under which most of our current international organizations were created to function. Some IOs have successfully changed, while others persist and have lost importance, and only very few organizations have ceased to exist. However there is little convincing theory to account for this variance. The mentioned negligence of the internal functioning of IOs, has led to a theoretical blind spot to explain phenomena of organizational persistence and change.<br /><br />In this study a new model, based on the concept of organizational learning, is proposed to explain the persistance and change of UN peace operations after the Cold War. This study underlines the importance of internal cognitive structures for change in international organizations. They emerge as a decisive factor in the explanation of organizational persistence of UN peace operations during the early 1990s, when the Secretariat refused to revise its traditional concept of peacekeeping. The OL approach brings to light the importance of signals about environmental changes and their ambiguity, as the UN was faced with very vague information, and was lacking the experience and resources to adjust to these new challenges. In this regard the importance of the interplay between decision-making bodies and the Secretariat is highlighted, as effective communication and a consensus between the two were deemed essential for successful change. As was observed, the Brahimi panel did not create new knowledge, but made an effort to communicate and build a consensus around existing recommendations for change. Related to this observation, our OL approach has drawn attention to hidden or implicit knowledge, which can be found in the organization and can be used by the administrative leadership to conduct reform. The OL approach emphasizes the significance of the absorptive capacity of IOs, as it demonstrates that the organizations needs ample resources to process information and that understaffing can also hamper learning and reform. External shock and crisis are identified as viable learning conditions of IOs. deposit-license 2005 Breul, Rainer 2011-03-24T10:13:13Z Organizational Learning in International Organizations : the Case of UN Peace Operations eng Breul, Rainer application/pdf

Dateiabrufe seit 01.10.2014 (Informationen über die Zugriffsstatistik)

Organizational_Learning_in_International_Organizations_FINAL.pdf 319

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