Floating faeces : Effects on solid removal and particle size distribution in RAS

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SCHUMANN, Mark, Julia UNGER, Alexander BRINKER, 2017. Floating faeces : Effects on solid removal and particle size distribution in RAS. In: Aquacultural Engineering. 78(Part A), pp. 75-84. ISSN 0144-8609. eISSN 1873-5614. Available under: doi: 10.1016/j.aquaeng.2016.10.007

@article{Schumann2017-08Float-40303, title={Floating faeces : Effects on solid removal and particle size distribution in RAS}, year={2017}, doi={10.1016/j.aquaeng.2016.10.007}, number={Part A}, volume={78}, issn={0144-8609}, journal={Aquacultural Engineering}, pages={75--84}, author={Schumann, Mark and Unger, Julia and Brinker, Alexander} }

2017-10-11T12:26:09Z Unger, Julia The removal of solid wastes originating from faecal matter is one of the decisive challenges for future fish farming, in particular given the current emphasis on water reuse in aquaculture. This study compared solid waste removal performance in replicate recirculating systems in which the only difference was the removal concept being deployed. Rainbow trout (Oncorhynchus mykiss) of the test group were fed an innovative diet supplemented with 2.5% cork granules (0.5–1 mm) resulting in buoyant faecal casts (density values below 1.00 g cm<sup>−3</sup>). These were removed directly from the tank by a low cost slotted pipe at the water surface. The control group was fed a conventional diet, identical to the experimental feed except that it lacked the cork additive. The resulting solids in both systems were removed by sedimentation in a classic manure pit, which was drained to the drum filter twice a day. Wastewater from both treatments was mechanically cleaned by a drum filter and biologically treated by a moving bed bioreactor before being returned to the tanks.<br /><br />The cork treatment led to a substantially higher solid load being delivered to the drum filter via the wastewater outflow than in the control system. The average removal efficiency of cork-treated wastes was more than twice that achieved in the control system (59% vs. 25%). Total suspended solid (TSS) in the backwash stream of the drum filter was about five times greater in the cork diet treatment. There was no significant difference in the particle size distribution or TSS load of water passing the 100 μm gauze of the drum filter in the two systems. Cork supplementation did not affect growth or mortality of rainbow trout. The present study shows that the application of floating faeces is an exciting prospect in recirculating aquaculture systems, offering significant improvements in solid removal efficiency. Floating faeces : Effects on solid removal and particle size distribution in RAS Brinker, Alexander Schumann, Mark Schumann, Mark Brinker, Alexander eng 2017-10-11T12:26:09Z 2017-08 Unger, Julia

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