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Transcriptomics, NF-κB Pathway, and Their Potential Spaceflight-Related Health Consequences

Transcriptomics, NF-κB Pathway, and Their Potential Spaceflight-Related Health Consequences

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ZHANG, Ye, Maria MORENO-VILLANUEVA, Stephanie KRIEGER, Govindarajan RAMESH, Srujana NEELAM, Honglu WU, 2017. Transcriptomics, NF-κB Pathway, and Their Potential Spaceflight-Related Health Consequences. In: International Journal of Molecular Sciences. 18(6), 1166. eISSN 1422-0067. Available under: doi: 10.3390/ijms18061166

@article{Zhang2017Trans-39625, title={Transcriptomics, NF-κB Pathway, and Their Potential Spaceflight-Related Health Consequences}, year={2017}, doi={10.3390/ijms18061166}, number={6}, volume={18}, journal={International Journal of Molecular Sciences}, author={Zhang, Ye and Moreno-Villanueva, Maria and Krieger, Stephanie and Ramesh, Govindarajan and Neelam, Srujana and Wu, Honglu}, note={Article Number: 1166} }

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Dateiabrufe seit 19.07.2017 (Informationen über die Zugriffsstatistik)

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