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Will climate change increase hybridization risk between potential plant invaders and their congeners in Europe?

Will climate change increase hybridization risk between potential plant invaders and their congeners in Europe?

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KLONNER, Günther, Iwona DULLINGER, Johannes WESSELY, Oliver BOSSDORF, Marta CARBONI, Wayne DAWSON, Franz ESSL, Andreas GATTRINGER, Emily HAEUSER, Mark VAN KLEUNEN, 2017. Will climate change increase hybridization risk between potential plant invaders and their congeners in Europe?. In: Diversity and Distributions. 23(8), pp. 934-943. ISSN 1366-9516. eISSN 1472-4642. Available under: doi: 10.1111/ddi.12578

@article{Klonner2017-08clima-39134, title={Will climate change increase hybridization risk between potential plant invaders and their congeners in Europe?}, year={2017}, doi={10.1111/ddi.12578}, number={8}, volume={23}, issn={1366-9516}, journal={Diversity and Distributions}, pages={934--943}, author={Klonner, Günther and Dullinger, Iwona and Wessely, Johannes and Bossdorf, Oliver and Carboni, Marta and Dawson, Wayne and Essl, Franz and Gattringer, Andreas and Haeuser, Emily and van Kleunen, Mark} }

Carboni, Marta van Kleunen, Mark Essl, Franz Dullinger, Iwona Klonner, Günther Bossdorf, Oliver van Kleunen, Mark Dawson, Wayne Klonner, Günther Gattringer, Andreas 2017-06-06T15:13:52Z Carboni, Marta 2017-06-06T15:13:52Z Bossdorf, Oliver Dullinger, Iwona eng Dawson, Wayne Aim: Interspecific hybridization can promote invasiveness of alien species. In many regions of the world, public and domestic gardens contain a huge pool of non-native plants. Climate change may relax constraints on their naturalization and hence facilitate hybridization with related species in the resident flora. Here, we evaluate this possible increase in hybridization risk by predicting changes in the overlap of climatically suitable ranges between a set of garden plants and their congeners in the resident flora.<br />Location: Europe.<br />Methods: From the pool of alien garden plants, we selected those which (1) are not naturalized in Europe, but established outside their native range elsewhere in the world; (2) belong to a genus where interspecific hybridization has been previously reported; and (3) have congeners in the native and naturalized flora of Europe. For the resulting set of 34 alien ornamentals as well as for 173 of their European congeners, we fitted species distribution models and projected suitable ranges under the current climate and three future climate scenarios. Changes in range overlap between garden plants and congeners were then assessed by means of the true skill statistic. Wessely, Johannes 2017-08 Haeuser, Emily Haeuser, Emily Wessely, Johannes Will climate change increase hybridization risk between potential plant invaders and their congeners in Europe? Gattringer, Andreas Essl, Franz

Dateiabrufe seit 06.06.2017 (Informationen über die Zugriffsstatistik)

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