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The effects of early life adversity on responses to the Montreal Imaging Stress Task

The effects of early life adversity on responses to the Montreal Imaging Stress Task

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BARTON, Alexander Stuart, Ellen ZAKRESKI, Jens PRUESSNER, 2016. The effects of early life adversity on responses to the Montreal Imaging Stress Task. In: Psychoneuroendocrinology. 71(suppl.), pp. 67. ISSN 0306-4530. eISSN 1873-3360. Available under: doi: 10.1016/j.psyneuen.2016.07.175

@article{Barton2016-09effec-38180, title={The effects of early life adversity on responses to the Montreal Imaging Stress Task}, year={2016}, doi={10.1016/j.psyneuen.2016.07.175}, number={suppl.}, volume={71}, issn={0306-4530}, journal={Psychoneuroendocrinology}, author={Barton, Alexander Stuart and Zakreski, Ellen and Pruessner, Jens} }

Zakreski, Ellen 2017-03-28T13:46:47Z 2017-03-28T13:46:47Z 2016-09 Pruessner, Jens Barton, Alexander Stuart The effects of early life adversity on responses to the Montreal Imaging Stress Task Barton, Alexander Stuart Zakreski, Ellen Pruessner, Jens Background<br />The effects of early life adversity (ELA) on function of the HPA-axis in adulthood have been thoroughly investigated. However, results have been mixed as to whether ELA has a blunting or potentiating effect on HPA reactivity. Furthermore, studies of the effects ELA has on other stress systems - such as the parasympathetic nervous system - are underrepresented. This study aimed to further flesh out the effects that ELA has on the reactivity of these two systems to a psychosocial stressor.<br /><br />Methods<br />Male subjects were prescreened using the Parental Bonding Instrument (PBI) and the Childhood Trauma Questionnaire (CTQ) in order to group participants according to high vs. low ELA. Upon arrival, subjects completed further questionnaires, including readministrations of the PBI and CTQ, then performed two nine minute trials of the Montreal Imaging Stress Task (MIST) to induce a social evaluative stress. Before, during, and after saliva samples and visual analog scales were administered to assay cortisol and report subjective stress, respectively. Subjects were required to wear an undershirt to record EKG and respiration for heart rate variability analysis. These data were used to derive respiratory sinus arrhythmia (RSA) measures.<br /><br />Results<br />RSA was found to drop significantly in response to the MIST across subjects. This response differed between groups having high vs. low ELA. Marked blunting of RSA was observed in the high ELA group when compared to the low group. Cortisol results are away for analysis and are still pending.<br /><br />Conclusions<br />Differences in stress reactivity associated with ELA were validated in response to the MIST. Thus the parasympathetic nervous system, like the HPA-axis, would appear to be another possible avenue by which ELA can have long term effects on general health outcomes. Finally, as the MIST is designed for a scanning environment these findings suggest that the MIST could be a crucial tool in investigating the neuro-functional underpinnings of ELA in the brain. eng

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