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Context matters : situational and biological factors shape reconsolidation of memories after psychosocial stress

Context matters : situational and biological factors shape reconsolidation of memories after psychosocial stress

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ALI, Nida, Jonas P. NITSCHKE, Cory COOPERMAN, Jens C. PRUESSNER, 2016. Context matters : situational and biological factors shape reconsolidation of memories after psychosocial stress. In: Psychoneuroendocrinology. 71(suppl.), pp. 19-20. ISSN 0306-4530. eISSN 1873-3360

@article{Ali2016-09Conte-38177, title={Context matters : situational and biological factors shape reconsolidation of memories after psychosocial stress}, year={2016}, doi={10.1016/j.psyneuen.2016.07.058}, number={suppl.}, volume={71}, issn={0306-4530}, journal={Psychoneuroendocrinology}, pages={19--20}, author={Ali, Nida and Nitschke, Jonas P. and Cooperman, Cory and Pruessner, Jens C.} }

Context matters : situational and biological factors shape reconsolidation of memories after psychosocial stress Pruessner, Jens C. eng Ali, Nida Cooperman, Cory Background<br /><br />Emotionally salient or stressful events are remembered better than neutral events. This is believed to be due to increased stress induced noradrenergic and glucocorticoid inputs to the amygdala and hippocampus, resulting in enhanced memories for emotionally salient material. While previous studies have examined how physiological stress responses modulate emotional memory reconsolidation and recall, few have studied the contribution of psychological processes related to stress processing, in the absence of a physiological stress response. Here, we pharmacologically suppressed the physiological stress systems and investigated the effects of the psychological aspects of stress on emotional memory reconsolidation and recall.<br /><br />Methods<br /><br />41 healthy men and women received placebo (n = 20) or pharmacological agents (n = 21; 2 mg dexamethasone the night before and 80 mg propranolol one hour before psychosocial stress induction via the Trier Social Stress Test. Following stress, participants reactivated previously seen neutral and emotional material. Recognition memory was tested 24 h later. Salivary cortisol and alpha-amylase responses to stress were assessed before, during and after stress induction.<br /><br />Results<br /><br />Dexamethasone and propranolol administration successfully suppressed the physiological stress response in participants. Memory reconsolidation following stress resulted in a better memory for neutral instead of emotional stimuli, while after pharmacological suppression of the stress response emotional and neutral memories were comparable.<br /><br />Conclusions<br /><br />Our results reveal the importance of context as it relates to social attention and memory formation, since the neutral faces of the audience during the TSST might have sensitized subjects to neutral faces during reconsolidation. These findings have important implications for understanding differential effects of situational and biological context (i.e. stress) on the underlying mechanisms associated with stress and its effects on attention and memory. 2017-03-28T13:36:08Z Ali, Nida Nitschke, Jonas P. 2017-03-28T13:36:08Z 2016-09 Pruessner, Jens C. Nitschke, Jonas P. Cooperman, Cory

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