In search of wh in-situ in Romance : an investigation in detective stories

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KAISER, Georg, Stefano QUAGLIA, 2015. In search of wh in-situ in Romance : an investigation in detective stories. In: BRANDNER, Ellen, ed., Anna CZYPIONKA, ed., Constantin FREITAG, ed., Andreas TROTZKE, ed.. Charting the Landscape of Linguistics : On the Scope of Josef Bayer’s Work ; Webschrift for Josef Bayer, pp. 92-103

@incollection{Kaiser2015searc-34161, title={In search of wh in-situ in Romance : an investigation in detective stories}, year={2015}, booktitle={Charting the Landscape of Linguistics : On the Scope of Josef Bayer’s Work ; Webschrift for Josef Bayer}, pages={92--103}, editor={Brandner, Ellen and Czypionka, Anna and Freitag, Constantin and Trotzke, Andreas}, author={Kaiser, Georg and Quaglia, Stefano} }

Kaiser, Georg In search of wh in-situ in Romance : an investigation in detective stories eng 2016-05-30T12:53:59Z 2016-05-30T12:53:59Z 2015 Quaglia, Stefano Quaglia, Stefano It is well known that languages differ with respect to the position of the wh-element in constituent questions. While in many languages these questions are generally formed by the fronting of the wh-element to a sentence-initial position, other languages require the whelement to remain in what seems to be its canonical position, i.e. in situ. One generally distinguishes a third type of languages forming constituent questions either by fronting the wh-element or by leaving it in situ. It is also well known that Josef Bayer feels a strong affection for question formation with wh-phrases in situ (cf. Bayer, 1996; Bayer, 2006; Bayer & Cheng, forthcoming). This is certainly one of the reasons—among others—why he likes Bangla, a language with (almost) obligatory wh-in-situ. Interestingly, there is another language for which Josef feels a strong affection, namely Italian. This is remarkable, since Italian is a language that generally does not allow wh-in-situ. What is also remarkable is that Josef maintains this affection by reading Italian detective stories by authors like Loriano Macchiavelli. Given these affections and contradictions and given that the authors of this paper feel a strong affection for Romance languages—one of the author actually being a native speaker of a Romance language, namely Italian—, our purpose is to provide a search on wh-in-situ questions in some Romance detective stories. Since French is known as a language that optionally allows for wh-in-situ, our study is based on a series of French detective stories, written by Jean-Claude Izzo, which will be compared with the translations into other Romance languages, namely Italian, Spanish, and Portuguese. The goal is to look for differences between these languages with respect to the use of the wh-in-situ option and to compare these results with the observations and explanations which have been made in the literature on (optional) wh-in-situ questions in Romance so far. Kaiser, Georg

Dateiabrufe seit 30.05.2016 (Informationen über die Zugriffsstatistik)

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