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Perceived Stress, Physical Activity and Motivation : Findings from an Internet Study

Perceived Stress, Physical Activity and Motivation : Findings from an Internet Study

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Prüfsumme: MD5:49edb7df7e9a2eacfd88b1b5970cfc6e

LIPPKE, Sonia, Julian WIENERT, Tim KUHLMANN, Sebastian FINK, Rainer HAMBRECHT, 2015. Perceived Stress, Physical Activity and Motivation : Findings from an Internet Study. In: Annals of Sports Medicine and Research. 2(1), 1012. ISSN 2379-0571

@article{Lippke2015Perce-33460, title={Perceived Stress, Physical Activity and Motivation : Findings from an Internet Study}, year={2015}, number={1}, volume={2}, issn={2379-0571}, journal={Annals of Sports Medicine and Research}, author={Lippke, Sonia and Wienert, Julian and Kuhlmann, Tim and Fink, Sebastian and Hambrecht, Rainer}, note={Article Number: 1012} }

2015 eng Perceived Stress, Physical Activity and Motivation : Findings from an Internet Study Fink, Sebastian 2016-03-24T10:01:27Z Fink, Sebastian Kuhlmann, Tim 2016-03-24T10:01:27Z Hambrecht, Rainer Wienert, Julian Lippke, Sonia Regular performance of sports and physical activity is important for health promotion, including managing stress. The current study therefore tested the relationship of stress and physical activity with body mass index (BMI) as well as the behavioral predictors’ intention, barriers, self-efficacy, and plans.<br />396 individuals participated in the study consisting of filling in an internet questionnaire. Study participants were between 17 and 79 years, and indicated a BMI between 17 and 53.<br />The minority was physically active (43.3%), and physical activity was related to a lower stress level (Chi² (df=1)=4.25, p=.04). However, when controlling for gender and BMI, stress was not related to physical activity any more: The higher the BMI, the lower the likelihood individuals were physically active (B=0.89; CI=0.84, 0.95). Moreover, if people had a higher intention, they were also more likely to be physically active (B=1.72; CI=1.41, 2.10). Furthermore, an interaction with stress transpired: In physically inactive individuals, stress perception seems to increase the motivation to become active. In already active individuals, the opposite pattern emerged (F=4.65, p<.05; Eta²=.01).<br />Implications could be to help active individuals to manage their stress to maintain high intentions and not to give intentions up due to feeling overwhelmed with managing stress and retaining their activity at the same time. Inactive individuals could benefit from becoming aware of their stress level and benefits of physical activity to actually adopt physical activity. While the data are only cross-sectional and findings should be interpreted with caution, the pattern can give important suggestions for designing interventions to increase physical activity and manage stress perceptions. Kuhlmann, Tim Hambrecht, Rainer Wienert, Julian Lippke, Sonia

Dateiabrufe seit 24.03.2016 (Informationen über die Zugriffsstatistik)

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