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A new face of sleep : the impact of post-learning sleep on recognition memory for face-name associations

A new face of sleep : the impact of post-learning sleep on recognition memory for face-name associations

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MAURER, Leonie, Kirsi-Marja ZITTING, Kieran ELLIOTT, Charles A. CZEISLER, Joseph M. RONDA, Jeanne F. DUFFY, 2015. A new face of sleep : the impact of post-learning sleep on recognition memory for face-name associations. In: Neurobiology of Learning and Memory. 126, pp. 31-38. ISSN 1074-7427. eISSN 1095-9564. Available under: doi: 10.1016/j.nlm.2015.10.012

@article{Maurer2015sleep-33225, title={A new face of sleep : the impact of post-learning sleep on recognition memory for face-name associations}, year={2015}, doi={10.1016/j.nlm.2015.10.012}, volume={126}, issn={1074-7427}, journal={Neurobiology of Learning and Memory}, pages={31--38}, author={Maurer, Leonie and Zitting, Kirsi-Marja and Elliott, Kieran and Czeisler, Charles A. and Ronda, Joseph M. and Duffy, Jeanne F.} }

eng Duffy, Jeanne F. Maurer, Leonie Ronda, Joseph M. Elliott, Kieran 2015 Zitting, Kirsi-Marja Sleep has been demonstrated to improve consolidation of many types of new memories. However, few prior studies have examined how sleep impacts learning of face-name associations. The recognition of a new face along with the associated name is an important human cognitive skill. Here we investigated whether post-presentation sleep impacts recognition memory of new face-name associations in healthy adults.<br />Fourteen participants were tested twice. Each time, they were presented 20 photos of faces with a corresponding name. Twelve hours later, they were shown each face twice, once with the correct and once with an incorrect name, and asked if each face-name combination was correct and to rate their confidence. In one condition the 12-h interval between presentation and recall included an 8-h nighttime sleep opportunity ("Sleep"), while in the other condition they remained awake ("Wake").<br />There were more correct and highly confident correct responses when the interval between presentation and recall included a sleep opportunity, although improvement between the "Wake" and "Sleep" conditions was not related to duration of sleep or any sleep stage.<br />These data suggest that a nighttime sleep opportunity improves the ability to correctly recognize face-name associations. Further studies investigating the mechanism of this improvement are important, as this finding has implications for individuals with sleep disturbances and/or memory impairments. Czeisler, Charles A. Zitting, Kirsi-Marja 2016-03-03T15:15:28Z Czeisler, Charles A. Ronda, Joseph M. Duffy, Jeanne F. A new face of sleep : the impact of post-learning sleep on recognition memory for face-name associations Maurer, Leonie Elliott, Kieran 2016-03-03T15:15:28Z

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