Thinking by Doing? : Epistemic Actions in the Tower of Hanoi

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NETH, Hansjörg, Stephen J. PAYNE, 2002. Thinking by Doing? : Epistemic Actions in the Tower of Hanoi. Cognitive Science Society. George Mason University, Fairfax, Virginia, USA, 7. Aug 2002 - 10. Aug 2002. In: GRAY, Wayne D., ed. and others. Proceedings of the Twenty-Fourth Annual Conference of the Cognitive Science Society : August 7 - 10, 2002, George Mason University, Fairfax, Virginia, USA. Cognitive Science Society. George Mason University, Fairfax, Virginia, USA, 7. Aug 2002 - 10. Aug 2002. Mahwah, NJ [u.a.]:Lawrence Erlbaum, pp. 691-696. ISBN 0-8058-4581-X

@inproceedings{Neth2002Think-28395, title={Thinking by Doing? : Epistemic Actions in the Tower of Hanoi}, year={2002}, isbn={0-8058-4581-X}, address={Mahwah, NJ [u.a.]}, publisher={Lawrence Erlbaum}, booktitle={Proceedings of the Twenty-Fourth Annual Conference of the Cognitive Science Society : August 7 - 10, 2002, George Mason University, Fairfax, Virginia, USA}, pages={691--696}, editor={Gray, Wayne D.}, author={Neth, Hansjörg and Payne, Stephen J.} }

2002 Neth, Hansjörg Thinking by Doing? : Epistemic Actions in the Tower of Hanoi deposit-license This article explores the concept of epistemic actions in the Tower of Hanoi (ToH) problem. Epistemic actions (Kirsh & Maglio, 1994) are actions that do not traverse the problem space toward the goal but facilitate subse- quent problem solving by changing the actor’s cogni- tive state. We report an experiment in which people re- peatedly solve ToH tasks. An instructional manipulation asked participants to minimize moves either trial by trial or only on the last three of six trials. This manipulation did not have the predicted effect on the trial-by-trial move counts. A second, device manipulation provided some participants with an “exploratory mode” in which move sequences could be tried then undone without affecting the criterion move count. Participants effectively used this mode to reduce moves on each trial, but there was no clear evidence that they used it to learn about the problem across trials. We conclude that there is strong evidence for one sub-type of epistemic action (acting-to-plan) but no evidence for a second sub-type (acting-to-learn). Payne, Stephen J. 2014-07-22T06:53:37Z Neth, Hansjörg eng Proceedings of the Twenty-Fourth Annual Conference of the Cognitive Science Society : August 7 - 10, 2002, George Mason University, Fairfax, Virginia, USA / Wayne D. Gray ..., ed. - Mahwah, NJ [u.a.] : Lawrence Erlbaum, 2002. - S. 691-696. - ISBN 0-8058-4581-X 2014-07-22T06:53:37Z Payne, Stephen J.

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