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How important are teachers' emotions in class for their students' emotions and motivation above and beyond cognitive activating instruction?

How important are teachers' emotions in class for their students' emotions and motivation above and beyond cognitive activating instruction?

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BECKER, Eva, Thomas GÖTZ, Vinzenz MORGER, 2014. How important are teachers' emotions in class for their students' emotions and motivation above and beyond cognitive activating instruction?. In: Personality and Individual Differences. 60, pp. S3. ISSN 0191-8869. eISSN 1873-3549. Available under: doi: 10.1016/j.paid.2013.07.146

@article{Becker2014impor-28177, title={How important are teachers' emotions in class for their students' emotions and motivation above and beyond cognitive activating instruction?}, year={2014}, doi={10.1016/j.paid.2013.07.146}, volume={60}, issn={0191-8869}, journal={Personality and Individual Differences}, author={Becker, Eva and Götz, Thomas and Morger, Vinzenz} }

Götz, Thomas Morger, Vinzenz Morger, Vinzenz 2014-06-25T06:07:46Z 2014-06-25T06:07:46Z How important are teachers' emotions in class for their students' emotions and motivation above and beyond cognitive activating instruction? Götz, Thomas Becker, Eva Personality and Individual Differences ; 60 (2014), Suppl. - S. S3 deposit-license 2014 Research based on Pekrun's control-value theory (2006) has shown that instructional behavior has an impact on students' emotions and motivation via their control and value appraisals. However, little is known about the relations between teachers' and students' emotions in the classroom even though a close link is suggested by crossover theory (cf. Härtel & Page, 2009). The present study examines the relations between students' reports on their teachers' emotions (joy and anger) and cognitive activating instructions (control and value induction) with their own emotions (joy, anger) and motivation (intrinsic valence) in class. Data was obtained via the experience-sampling-method from 141 students (78 women, Mage = 15.6 years) in a total of 2064 school lessons. Multilevel regression analyses showed that both students' emotions and motivation are related to teachers' emotions with students emotions being even stronger related to teachers emotions than to their instructional behavior. Implications for research and educational practice are outlined. Becker, Eva eng

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