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Whole-body vibration versus eccentric training and wait-and-see approach for chronic Achilles tendinopathy : a randomized clinical trial

Whole-body vibration versus eccentric training and wait-and-see approach for chronic Achilles tendinopathy : a randomized clinical trial

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HORSTMANN, Thomas, Holger JUD, Vanessa FRÖHLICH, Annegret MÜNDERMANN, Stefan GRAU, 2013. Whole-body vibration versus eccentric training and wait-and-see approach for chronic Achilles tendinopathy : a randomized clinical trial. In: Journal of Orthopaedic & Sports Physical Therapy. 43(11), pp. 794-803. ISSN 0190-6011. eISSN 1938-1344

@article{Horstmann2013-11Whole-26650, title={Whole-body vibration versus eccentric training and wait-and-see approach for chronic Achilles tendinopathy : a randomized clinical trial}, year={2013}, doi={10.2519/jospt.2013.4762}, number={11}, volume={43}, issn={0190-6011}, journal={Journal of Orthopaedic & Sports Physical Therapy}, pages={794--803}, author={Horstmann, Thomas and Jud, Holger and Fröhlich, Vanessa and Mündermann, Annegret and Grau, Stefan} }

Jud, Holger Horstmann, Thomas Grau, Stefan deposit-license Fröhlich, Vanessa Study Design<br /><br />Randomized clinical trial.<br /><br /><br />Objectives<br /><br />To test the hypothesis that whole-body vibration training results in greater improvements in symptoms and pain, structural changes, and muscle flexibility and strength of the triceps surae muscle-tendon unit than those achieved with eccentric training or with a wait-and-see approach.<br /><br /><br />Background<br /><br />The potential use of vibration training for the treatment of Achilles tendinopathy has not been explored.<br /><br /><br />Methods<br /><br />Fifty-eight patients (mean age, 46.0 years) with Achilles tendinopathy were randomly assigned to a 12-week intervention using whole-body vibration training, eccentric training, or a wait-and-see approach. Pain, tendon structure and path, and muscle flexibility and strength were assessed at baseline and follow-up, and compared using mixed-factor analyses of variance.<br /><br /><br />Results<br /><br />Pain improvements at the midsection of the tendon were greater in the vibration- and eccentric-training groups than in the wait-and-see group (mean difference from the vibration-training group, -18.0; 95% confidence interval [CI]: -35.0, -1.1; mean difference from the eccentric-training group, -27.0; 95% CI: -50.9, -3.1). Improvements in pain at the musculotendinous junction were greater in the eccentric-training group than in the other groups (mean difference from the vibration-training group, -31.4; 95% CI: -60.7, -2.0; mean difference from the wait-and-see group, -50.2; 95% CI: -82.3, -18.1). Improvements in most participants were achieved in the vibration-training group, followed by the eccentric-training group.<br /><br /><br />Conclusion<br /><br />Vibration training may be an alternative or a complementary treatment in patients who do not respond well to eccentric training, especially in those with insertional pain.<br /><br /> eng Horstmann, Thomas 2014-02-27T13:10:42Z Grau, Stefan Mündermann, Annegret Mündermann, Annegret Fröhlich, Vanessa 2014-02-27T13:10:42Z 2013-11 Journal of Orthopaedic & Sports Physical Therapy Whole-body vibration versus eccentric training and wait-and-see approach for chronic Achilles tendinopathy : a randomized clinical trial Jud, Holger

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