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Dietary supply with polyunsaturated fatty acids and resulting maternal effects influence host - parasite interactions

Dietary supply with polyunsaturated fatty acids and resulting maternal effects influence host - parasite interactions

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SCHLOTZ, Nina, Dieter EBERT, Dominik MARTIN-CREUZBURG, 2013. Dietary supply with polyunsaturated fatty acids and resulting maternal effects influence host - parasite interactions. In: BMC Ecology. 13(1), 41. eISSN 1472-6785. Available under: doi: 10.1186/1472-6785-13-41

@article{Schlotz2013Dieta-25980, title={Dietary supply with polyunsaturated fatty acids and resulting maternal effects influence host - parasite interactions}, year={2013}, doi={10.1186/1472-6785-13-41}, number={1}, volume={13}, journal={BMC Ecology}, author={Schlotz, Nina and Ebert, Dieter and Martin-Creuzburg, Dominik}, note={Article Number: 41} }

Dietary supply with polyunsaturated fatty acids and resulting maternal effects influence host - parasite interactions eng 2014-02-03T10:41:43Z Martin-Creuzburg, Dominik 2013 Schlotz, Nina 2014-02-03T10:41:43Z deposit-license Martin-Creuzburg, Dominik Ebert, Dieter Ebert, Dieter Background<br /><br />Interactions between hosts and parasites can be substantially modulated by host nutrition.<br />Polyunsaturated fatty acids (PUFAs) are essential dietary nutrients; they are indispensable as structural components<br />of cell membranes and as precursors for eicosanoids, signalling molecules which act on reproduction and<br />immunity. Here, we explored the potential of dietary PUFAs to affect the course of parasitic infections using a<br />well-established invertebrate host – parasite system, the freshwater herbivore Daphnia magna and its bacterial<br />parasite Pasteuria ramosa.<br /><br /><br />Results<br /><br />Using natural food sources differing in their PUFA composition and by experimentally modifying the<br />availability of dietary arachidonic acid (ARA) and eicosapentaenoic acid (EPA) we examined PUFA-mediated effects<br />resulting from direct consumption as well as maternal effects on offspring of treated mothers. We found that both<br />host and parasite were affected by food quality. Feeding on C20 PUFA-containing food sources resulted in higher<br />offspring production of hosts and these effects were conveyed to a great extent to the next generation. While<br />feeding on a diet containing high PUFA concentrations significantly reduced the likelihood of becoming infected,<br />the infection success in the next generation increased whenever the maternal diet contained PUFAs. We suggest<br />that this opposing effect was caused by a trade-off between reproduction and immunity in the second generation.<br /><br /><br />Conclusions<br /><br />Considering the direct and maternal effects of dietary PUFAs on host and parasite we propose that<br />host – parasite interactions and thus disease dynamics under natural conditions are subject to the availability of<br />dietary PUFAs. Schlotz, Nina BMC Ecology ; 13 (2013). - 41

Dateiabrufe seit 01.10.2014 (Informationen über die Zugriffsstatistik)

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