Economic Experiments on Impulsive Urges, Control, and Irrationality

Lade...
Vorschaubild
Dateien
Diss_Bendrick.pdf
Diss_Bendrick.pdfGröße: 2.44 MBDownloads: 212
Datum
2012
Herausgeber:innen
Kontakt
ISSN der Zeitschrift
Electronic ISSN
ISBN
Bibliografische Daten
Verlag
Schriftenreihe
Auflagebezeichnung
DOI (zitierfähiger Link)
ArXiv-ID
Internationale Patentnummer
Angaben zur Forschungsförderung
Projekt
FOR "Psychoeconomics" TP 04 Processing Social Preferences
Open Access-Veröffentlichung
Open Access Green
Core Facility der Universität Konstanz
Gesperrt bis
Titel in einer weiteren Sprache
Forschungsvorhaben
Organisationseinheiten
Zeitschriftenheft
Publikationstyp
Dissertation
Publikationsstatus
Published
Erschienen in
Zusammenfassung

One of the standard assumptions underlying microeconomic theory is that more opportunities from which to choose cannot be a bad thing. Indeed, it is logical from a welfare perspective and a common sense perspective that things like more employment opportunities, including the social mobility that goes along with it, allows a person to realize a higher level of life satisfaction in multiple realms. Logically this freedom to choose should extend to the decision situation, in that a person should not seek to restrict the type of environment she makes her decisions in. This thesis contains studies in which decision environments have potential negative effects on the decision-maker’s welfare. We believe that if the decision maker were to be made aware of the type of effect the environment had on her decision, she would seek to restrict her environment, in other words the way information is transmitted to her.

More generally, the thesis looks at different types of control. All studies have to do with control, whether it be internal control, such as dealing with one’s own temptations, or external control, such as an irrational aversion to ceding another person control over your own payoff (for example, allowsing someone else to be in the driver seat despite equal abilities, or an unwillingness to let a computer determine one’s own lotto ticket numbers). It looks at human decision making through the lens of dual processing models, specifically the interplay between an impulsive, fast, and biased decision-making system; and a slow, deliberative, rational one (2004). Much behavioral research is pointing to the importance of understanding these two motivations in everything from exercise patterns to reciprocity in social interactions (DellaVigna & Malmendier (2006), Knoch, et al., (2006)).

This thesis is divided into four chapters. The first three chapters concern behavioral biases and inconsistencies brought to light by psychologists and behavioral scientists. The fourth chapter concerns the processing of conflicting motivation in social decision making. The first two chapters concern intertemporal decision making. Chapters 1, 2, and 4 are joint work with Urs Fischbacher.

Chapter 1 (Projection Bias: The Price for Food Craving) is about biases in how people predict their future preferences. Most decisions people make involve consequences for the future, and as a result the decision maker must make an estimate about what her preferences will be at that time. Of course these predictions are just that, an estimate, and are subject to error. They are also subject to biases. Projection bias (Loewenstein, O'Donoghue, & Rabin, 2003) is the tendency for predictions about preferences in a different “state” from the one at the moment of deciding are biased toward the one a person is in at the moment of deciding. For instance, Read & van Leeuwen (1998) show that people who are hungry when making a decision are more likely to choose an unhealthy snack to be received at a future date than people who are not hungry when making the decision. Indeed, if a person expects to be hungry in the future it makes sense to pick the more calorie rich food item, and people do. However, current levels of hunger should have no effect, but there is a large impact. Of those who are hungry when making their decision, 78% (56%) choose the unhealthy snack when they predict they will be hungry (satiated) at the time of receipt, whereas for those who are satiated when decided, only 42% (26%) choose the unhealthy, calorie-rich snack.

Our study also deals with projection bias under hungry and sated states. We use an exogenous and randomly assigned treatment variable to manipulate hunger levels of our subjects, whereas past studies have not. In our experiment, subjects participate in a Vickrey auction for high quality chocolates to be received on a later day, in which it is optimal for a subject to bid her true willingness to pay for a good. We are therefore not only able to show the existence of projection bias, we also show its effect on willingness to pay for products. Projection bias in the marketplace affects consumption decisions, and therefore lifetime patterns of consumption, saving, and overall well-being. It is also a potential source of gain for firms, and for these reasons understanding how projection bias translates into willingness to pay is important. We show that hungry subjects are willing to pay 58% higher prices for a small box of chocolates than sated subjects.

Chapter 2 (Battling Impulses: Intertemporal Choice in the Short Term) contains three experiments about self-control. Many studies look at impatience by giving subjects a series of decisions between an early, small payoff and a later, larger payoff (delay discounting tasks). These types of studies generally go further to estimate the implied discount rates of subjects’ decisions. Most studies (with a few exceptions) use monetary rewards as a payoff medium, and time spans of the tradeoffs are quite large, on the order of months or years. Using monetary rewards to study time preferences involves problems, mainly because money is not a primary reward; rather it is an opportunity set from which people can obtain a real reward. We are interested in this study in very short term impatience. Indeed, we think that short term impatience is very important to understand, as most temptation occurs when the prospect of a reward is imminent. This makes the use of monetary rewards even less appropriate for our study. We therefore introduce the paradigm of computer games as a medium of reward. Past studies have used food; we viewed this as problematic as we expect it to violate the “more is not worse” concept. We chose our computer game to be tempting and enjoyable, and contrasted it with an annoying task. We did this, so that even if subjects did not want expressly to play the game (which they were not forced to play), they would still desire to avoid the annoying task. Our treatment variable is intended to manipulate the degree to which impulsive motivations are given priority. In the less impulse-friendly environment, subjects make decisions regarding the game before they start the experiment, so before they are actually involved in the game or the task. In the more impulsive environment, they make their decisions while doing the game or task.

We link behavior in our “temptation tasks” to scores on the Barratt Impulsiveness Scale (BIS), and in experiment 3 of the series we show that behavior is additionally linked to the delay discounting task, using Amazon.de gift certificates as a reward medium. We find that scores on the BIS have more predictive power in the impulsive condition. Furthermore, we find with the delay discounting task that subjects are “present-oriented”; that is have declining discount rates.

Chapter 3 (Handing Over the Reins: On the Social Nature of the Illusion of Control) concerns the “Illusion of Control” brought to light by Ellen Langer (1975). The illusion of control appears in decisions involving risk. Risky decisions in real life not only involve risk preferences, but also skill. For example, skiing is a risky activity, but the more skill a person has, the lower the probability of an accident (holding choice of slope difficulty constant). In this situation, the amount of risk a person takes depends in part on her assessment of her own skill level. Ellen Langer argues that people conflate the skill with the risk elements, and even when they are given control over elements of a task that have no influence on the risk involved, act as if they have been given (partial) control over the lottery. This leads people to potentially take more risk in situations in which they have a feeling of control.

Recent work by economists has challenged this notion, and found conflicting results over whether the bias exists. Past studies have generally compared giving illusory control to the decision maker versus giving it to another person. In this paper, I put forth the proposition that this comparison may lead to many different conclusions about whether there is an illusion of control if there is heterogeneity in subjects’ perceptions of their own skill level versus that of another person. I therefore conduct an experiment which makes it possible to observe whether there is heterogeneity in the type of illusion subjects have, and to then categorize them according to this characteristic. I also link their observed illusion of control to scores on the Magical Ideation Scale, which has been shown to be positively related to illusion of control biases (Brugger & Graves, 1997). I find in my study what initially looks like an illusion of control. However, I argue that it is actually the result of randomization. I also observe a link between scores on the Magical Ideation Scale and the amount of variation in individual answers, which I also will argue is the result of randomization, coupled with the unusual distribution of Magical Ideation scores.
Chapter 4 (Social Decision-Making Processes) looks at the processing of different types of conflict in social decision making through observing reaction times. We look at ego conflict (conflict between selfish and social motives) and social conflict (conflict between different social motivating factors). We use traditional (1st party) dictator games, where a decision maker decides over distributions of money for herself and another person, as well as 3rd party dictator games in which a decision maker decides over distributions for two other people with no consequences for her own payoff. We record reaction times as a way of measuring the conflict in a decision and as a way to assess the automaticity or controlled nature of selfish and social motivations. Rubinstein (2007) showed that reaction times could be used as a measurement of conflict when making a decision, and that lower conflict results in quick responses and higher conflict in faster responses. Additionally, automatic processes are thought to be fast and cheap, whereas controlled ones are slow and expensive; therefore we will be able to use reaction times to examine this idea. In our context, the 1st party decisions contain more conflict than the 3rd party conditions, simply because they contain a selfish motivation. With the 3rd party condition, we can assess the individual’s personal norm; that is her attitude about what is a fair way to allocate between two people independent of any selfish motivation. Past studies have shown that selfish decisions are made more quickly than decisions in favor of another person. We introduce the 3rd party condition to assess whether it is the selfish aspect of the decision that results in faster reaction times for selfish decisions, or another, previously undetected property of the decision.

We find that an increase in social conflict (that is, conflict between social motivating factors) results in increased reaction times. We further found that though selfish decisions are made faster, this is not the result of selfish motivation, but of other aspects of the decision. We also find that the personal norm is not well characterized according to our three identified types of social motivation (efficiency, maximin preferences, and absolute inequality aversion). The personal norm predicts increases in reaction times better than ego conflict with any particular social property, showing that the personal norm captures individual heterogeneity in values.

Zusammenfassung in einer weiteren Sprache

Eine der Standard-Annahmen der mikroökonomischen Theorie ist, dass mehr Auswahlmöglichkeiten keine schlechte Sache sein können. In der Tat erscheint es von einem wohlfahrtsökonomischen Standpunkt logisch, dass mehr Beschäftigungs-möglichkeiten und die damit einhergehende soziale Mobilität die Zufriedenheit von Personen in verschiedenen Bereichen erhöhen können. Eine Vielfalt an Möglichkeiten sollte sich also auch positiv auf die Entscheidungssituation selbst auswirken, insofern dass Personen sich nicht auf bestimmte Umgebungen beschränken möchten, in denen sie ihre Entscheidungen treffen. Die vorliegende Arbeit beinhaltet Studien, in denen sich bestimmte Entscheidungsumgebungen negativ auf das Entscheidungsverhalten des Entscheiders auswirken können. Es ist davon auszugehen, dass Personen, die sich des negativen Einflusses bestimmter Entscheidungsumgebungen bewusst sind, ihre Entscheidungsumgebung (das heißt, die Art und Weise, in der Informationen als Ent-scheidungsgrundlage bereitgestellt werden) systematisch beschränken.

Generell befasst sich diese vorliegende Dissertation mit unterschiedlichen Arten von Kontrolle: Einerseits wird die interne Kontrolle betrachtet, bei der es darum geht, den eigenen Versuchungen zu widerstehen. Andererseits wird die externe Kontrolle untersucht und die irrationale Aversion vor selbiger, bei der man versucht Situationen auszuweichen, in denen andere Personen die Kontrolle über die eigene Wohlfahrt haben (z.B. lässt man trotz gleicher Fähigkeiten ungern andere auf den Fahrersitz oder man lässt ungern den Computer über die eigenen Lottozahlen entscheiden). Die Dissertation betrachtet menschliches Entscheidungsverhalten aus der Perspektive von Dualen-Prozess-Modellen, d.h. insbesondere wird auf das Zusammenspiel von impulsiven schnellen und verzerrten Entscheidungen und langsamen wohlüberlegten und rationalen Entscheidungen eingegangen (Strack & Deutsch, 2004). Eine Vielzahl an Studien aus der Verhaltensforschung verdeutlicht die Wichtigkeit des Verständnisses dieser beiden Motivationen bei individuellen und sozialen Entscheidungen, so z.B. beim individuellen Trainingsverhalten im Sport oder bei der Reziprozität in sozialen Interaktionen (DellaVigna & Malmendier (2006), Knoch, et al., (2006)).

Die vorliegende Arbeit ist in vier Kapitel unterteilt. Die ersten drei Kapitel befassen sich mit Verhaltensmustern und Inkonsistenzen, die durch Psychologen und Verhaltensforscher aufgedeckt wurden. Das vierte Kapitel behandelt die Verarbeitung von widersprüchlichen Motivation in sozialen Entscheidungsprozessen. Die ersten beiden Kapitel befassen sich mit intertemporalen Entscheidungen. Die Kapitel 1, 2 und 4 sind aus gemeinsamen Arbeiten mit Urs Fischbacher entstanden.
Kapitel 1 (Projection Bias: The Price for Food Craving) beschäftigt sich mit der Fähigkeit von Menschen, ihre zukünftigen Präferenzen vorhersagen zu können. In der Regel treffen Menschen Entscheidungen, die Konsequenzen für die Zukunft haben. Das bedeutet, der Entscheidungsträger muss zum Zeitpunkt der Entscheidung eine Einschätzung über seine zukünftigen Präferenzen treffen. Diese Schätzung ist in der Regel mit Fehlern behaftet, oder gar systematisch verzerrt. Der sogenannte Projektions-Bias (Loewenstein, O'Donoghue, und Rabin, 2003) ist die Tendenz, die gegenwärtigen Präferenzen, d.h. die Präferenzen zum Zeitpunkt der Entscheidung, auf zukünftige Vorlieben zu projektzieren, so dass die zukünftigen Erwartungen systematisch in Richtung der gegenwärtigen Präferenzen verzerrt sind. Zum Beispiel zeigen Read und van Leeuwen (1998), dass die Entscheidung darüber, einen ungesunden oder einen gesunden Snack in der Zukunft zu erhalten, davon abhängt, ob der Entscheidungsträger in der Gegenwart hungrig ist oder nicht. Wenn eine Person erwartet, in der Zukunft hungrig zu sein, ist es sinnvoll, das kalorienreichere Nahrungsmittel zu bevorzugen. Dieses Verhalten ist auch bei den Teilnehmern zu beobachten. Allerdings sollte der derzeitige Hunger keinen Einfluss auf die Entscheidung über das in der Zukunft konsumierte gut haben. Wenn Teilnehmer hungrig sind, 78% (56%) entscheiden sie sich für das ungesundes Essen wenn sie denken, dass sie hungrig (nicht hungrig) im Zukunft sein werden; wenn sie nicht hungrig sind, nur 42% (26%) entscheiden sich für das ungesundes Essen.

Unsere Studie befasst sich ebenfalls mit dem Projektions-Bias in Abhängigkeit des Hungerzustandes. Im Unterschied Vorgängerstudien nutzen wir eine exogene und randomisierte Treatmentvariable, um den Hunger der Experimentteilnehmer zu manipulieren. Im Experiment nehmen die Teilnehmer an einer Vickrey-Auktion teil, in der sie auf eine Schokolade höchster Qualität bieten. Die Schokolade erhalten die Teilnehmer an einem Folgetag. Diese Vickrey-Auktionsform ist Anreiz kompatibel. Das heißt, es ist für jeden Teilnehmer optimal, seine wahre Zahlungsbereitschaft anzugeben. Daher ist es uns nicht nur möglich, die Existenz des Projektionsbias zu bestätigen, sondern auch zu quantifizieren, inwiefern er ökonomische Größen, nämlich die Zahlungsbereitschaft für zukünftige Güter beeinflusst. Der Projektions-Bias hat also Konsequenzen für Konsumentscheidungen in realen Märkten und somit auch für Konsumentscheidungen über die Lebenszeit, Sparentscheidungen und das allgemeine Wohlbefinden. Zudem bietet das gewonnene Verständnis für den Projektions-Bias hinsichtlich der Zahlungsbereitschaft von Konsumenten Implikationen zur Gewinnsteigerung für Unternehmen. Unsere Studie zeigt, dass hungrige Konsumenten eine Zahlungsbereitschaft für eine kleine Schachtel Schokolade haben, die im Schnitt 58 Prozent über der Zahlungsbereitschaft der gesättigten Teilnehmer liegt.

Kapitel 2 (Battling Impulses: Intertemporal Choice in the Short Term) enthält drei Experimente zur Selbstkontrolle. Viele Studien untersuchen Ungeduld von Teilnehmern, in dem sie die Teilnehmer zwischen kleinen Geldbeträgen heute und unterschiedlichen größeren Geldbeträgen in der Zukunft entscheiden lassen (sogenannte „delay discounting tasks“). Diese Studien gehen in der Regel noch einen Schritt weiter und schätzen den impliziten Diskontfaktor der Teilnehmer. Dabei wird (mit wenigen Ausnahmen) Geld als Entlohnungsmedium genutzt und die Auszahlungszeitpunkte liegen sehr weit auseinander (Monate oder gar Jahre). Geld als Medium zu nutzen, wenn man Zeitpräferenzen misst, führt zu Problemen, da Geld weniger als direkte Belohnung sondern eher als Möglichkeit, sich selbst zu belohnen, wahrgenommen wird. Im Gegensatz zu diesen Studien untersuchen wir in unseren Experimenten eine kurzfristigere Form der Ungeduld. Das Verständnis von kurzfristigen Formen der Ungeduld ist wichtig, da Versuchungen häufig auftreten, wenn die Belohnung sehr zeitnah stattfindet. Für diese Untersuchung erscheint Geld als Medium der Entlohnung weniger geeignet. Aus diesem Grund haben wir ein „Paradigma der Computerspiele“ als Belohnungsmedium entwickelt. Andere Studien in diesem Bereich haben Essen als Belohnungsmedium genutzt, allerdings verletzt dieses die Annahme der Nichtsättigung. Wir wählten ein Computerspiel, das Spaß bereitete und eine Versuchung für die Teilnehmer darstellte und stellten diesem eine eintönige und langweilige Arbeitsaufgabe gegenüber. Auf diese Weise konnten wir sicherstellen, dass Teilnehmer, die das Computerspiel nicht unbedingt spielen wollten, zumindest der langweiligen Arbeitsaufgabe ausweichen konnten. Die Treatmentvariable bestand in der Ent¬scheidungsumgebung. Sie wurde so gewählt, dass impulsive Entscheidungen in einer Umgebung stärker als in der anderen geschehen konnten. In der Umgebung, die weniger impulsivitätsfreundlich war, trafen die Teilnehmer bereits vor dem Start des Experiments, also bevor sie mit dem Spiel oder der Aufgabe beschäftigt waren, Entscheidungen bezüglich des Spiels. In der impulsivitätsfreundlichen Umgebung entschieden die Teilnehmer, während sie mit dem Spiel oder der Aufgabe beschäftigt waren.

Für die Analyse verknüpften wir das Verhalten im Experiment mit dem Score der Teilnehmer auf dem Barratt Impulsiveness Scale (BIS). In Experiment 3 wurde das Verhalten zusätzlich in Relation zu einer sogenannten „delay discounting task“ gebracht, in dem eine Amazon Gutschein als Belohnungsmedium genutzt wurde. Unsere Ergebnisse zeigen, dass die BIS Scores eine bessere Vorhersagekraft in der impulsivitätsfreundlichen Umgebung als in der impulsivitätsfeindlichen Umgebung haben. Zudem zeigte sich im delay discounting task, dass die Teilnehmer „present-biased“ sind, d.h. dass ihr Verhalten mit abnehmenden Diskontraten übereinstimmt.

Kapitel 3 (Handing Over the Reins: On the Social Nature of the Illusion of Control) befasst sich mit der „Kontrollillusion“, die erstmals durch Ellen Langer (1975) hervorgehoben wurde. Kontrollillusion tritt in Situation auf, die Risiken beinhalten. In der Realität spielen in riskanten Situationen sowohl die Risikopräferenzen als auch die Fähigkeiten von einzelnen Personen eine Rolle. Zum Beispiel stellt Skifahren eine riskante Beschäftigung dar, jedoch ist Skifahren umso weniger riskant, umso bessere Fähigkeiten eine Person hinsichtlich des Skifahrens besitzt (gegeben die Wahl der befahrene Skipiste wird als fix angenommen). In einer solchen Situation ist also das Risiko, das eine Person eingeht, davon abhängig wie fähig diese Person ist. Ellen Langer argumentiert, dass Personen häufig ihre eigenen Fähigkeiten und die Risikoelemente der Entscheidungen verwechseln, selbst bei Aufgaben, bei denen sie lediglich Kontrolle über Dinge haben, die das Risiko nicht beeinflussen.

Jüngere ökonomische Studien liefern allerdings Ergebnisse, die dieser Heran-gehensweise teilweise widersprechen. In den meisten Studien haben die Teilnehmer dabei fiktive Kontrolle, oder eine dritte Person erhält die Kontrolle. In diesem Kapitel verdeutliche ich, dass Vergleiche auf dieser Basis problematisch sein können, wenn sich die Teilnehmer in der subjektiven Wahrnehmung bezüglich der eigenen Fähigkeiten und der Fähigkeiten der anderen Teilnehmer unterscheiden. Um herauszufinden, ob diese Wahrnehmungen tatsächlich heterogen sind, habe ich ein Experiment entwickelt, in dem es möglich ist, die subjektive Kontrollillusionen einzelner Teilnehmer zu untersuchen und die Teilnehmer dann gemäß dieser zu kategorisieren. Zusätzlich verknüpfe ich die beobachtete Kontrollillusion der Teilnehmer mit ihren Scores auf dem „Magical Ideation Scale“, für den bereits gezeigt wurde, dass er in positivem Zusammenhang mit der Kontrollillusion steht (Brugger und Graves, 1997). Auf den ersten Blick scheinen die Ergebnisse meiner Studie zu zeigen, dass die Teilnehmer eine Kontrollillusion haben. Ich argumentiere jedoch, dass diese das Resultat einer Randomisierung gepaart mit einer ungewöhnlichen Verteilung der Magical Ideation Scores ist.

Kapitel 4 (Social Decision-Making Processes) befasst sich mit einer Studie, in der wir die kognitive Verarbeitung von unterschiedlichen sozialen Konflikten durch die Messung von Reaktionszeiten schätzen. Die betrachteten unterschiedlichen Konflikte sind dabei einerseits ein Ego-Konflikt (also ein Konflikt zwischen eigener Auszahlung und anderen sozialen Motiven) und andererseits ein sozialer Konflikt (also ein Konflikt zwischen unterschiedlichen sozialen Faktoren). Um das Verhalten der Teilnehmer zu unter¬suchen, partizipieren diese einerseits in (1st party) Diktator Spielen, in denen der Entscheidungsträger über Auszahlungsverteilungen, die ihn selbst und andere betreffen entscheidet, und andererseits in 3rd party Diktator Spielen, in denen der Entscheidungsträger über Auszahlungsverteilungen für zwei andere Teilnehmer entscheidet. Wir messen die Reaktionszeiten als einen Näherungswert für den Konflikt in einer Entscheidung und als Maß für die automatisierte oder kontrollierte Natur egoistischer und sozialer Motive. Rubinstein (2007) hat gezeigt, dass Reaktionszeiten als Konfliktmaß verwendet werden können, und dass die Reaktionszeiten umso kürzer ausfallen, umso geringer der Konflikt ist. Zudem wird davon ausgegangen, dass automatisierte Prozesse schnell und wenig Ressourcen benötigen während kontrol-lierte Prozesse als langsam und Ressourcen intensiv gelten. In unserer Studie beinhalteten die Entscheidungen in den 1st party Diktator Spielen mehr Konflikte als in den 3rd party Diktator Spielen, da egoistische Motive und die daraus resultierenden Konflikte nur in den ersteren Spielen vorhanden waren. In den 3rd party Diktator Spielen konnten dagegen individuelle Normen, gemessen werden, d.h. die Einstellungen der Teilnehmer hinsichtlich einer fairen Aufteilung eines Geldbetrages unabhängig der eigenen egoistischen Motive. Studien haben gezeigt, dass egoistische Handlungen schneller getroffen werden als Entscheidungen zum Wohle anderer. Die 3rd party Diktator Spiele dienen dazu herauszufinden, ob es tatsächlich die egoistischen Motive sind, die zu schnelleren Entscheidungen führen oder ob diesem Phänomen andere Mechanismen zugrunde liegen.

Wir finden dass ein Anstieg im sozialen Konflikt (das bedeutet ein Konflikt zwischen unterschiedlichen sozialen Motiven) zu längeren Reaktionszeiten führt. Zudem finden wir, dass obwohl egoistische Entscheidungen schneller getroffen werden, die damit verbundenen kürzeren Reaktionszeiten nicht das Resultat egoistischer Motive sind, sondern von anderen Aspekten der Entscheidungen abhängen. Um die individuellen Normen der Teilnehmer zu identifizieren, wurden drei Typen sozialer Motivation (Effizienz, Maximin-Präferenzen und absolute Ungleichheitsaversion) unterstellt. Jedoch stellte sich heraus, dass eine Charakterisierung der sogenannten persönlichen Norm durch Kombination der drei Typen dennoch schwierig ist. Dennoch erklärt die persönlichen Norm Anstiege in den Reaktionszeiten besser als der Ego-Konflikt mit den von uns bestimmten sozialen Motivationen. Dies deutet darauf hin, dass die persönliche Norm die Heterogenität der persönlichen Werte besser erfasst.

Fachgebiet (DDC)
330 Wirtschaft
Schlagwörter
Irrationality, projection bias, time preference, self-control, illusion of control, social preferences
Konferenz
Rezension
undefined / . - undefined, undefined
Zitieren
ISO 690BENDRICK, Katharine, 2012. Economic Experiments on Impulsive Urges, Control, and Irrationality [Dissertation]. Konstanz: University of Konstanz
BibTex
@phdthesis{Bendrick2012Econo-20838,
  year={2012},
  title={Economic Experiments on Impulsive Urges, Control, and Irrationality},
  author={Bendrick, Katharine},
  address={Konstanz},
  school={Universität Konstanz}
}
RDF
<rdf:RDF
    xmlns:dcterms="http://purl.org/dc/terms/"
    xmlns:dc="http://purl.org/dc/elements/1.1/"
    xmlns:rdf="http://www.w3.org/1999/02/22-rdf-syntax-ns#"
    xmlns:bibo="http://purl.org/ontology/bibo/"
    xmlns:dspace="http://digital-repositories.org/ontologies/dspace/0.1.0#"
    xmlns:foaf="http://xmlns.com/foaf/0.1/"
    xmlns:void="http://rdfs.org/ns/void#"
    xmlns:xsd="http://www.w3.org/2001/XMLSchema#" > 
  <rdf:Description rdf:about="https://kops.uni-konstanz.de/server/rdf/resource/123456789/20838">
    <dcterms:abstract xml:lang="eng">One of the standard assumptions underlying microeconomic theory is that more opportunities from which to choose cannot be a bad thing. Indeed, it is logical from a welfare perspective and a common sense perspective that things like more employment opportunities, including the social mobility that goes along with it, allows a person to realize a higher level of life satisfaction in multiple realms. Logically this freedom to choose should extend to the decision situation, in that a person should not seek to restrict the type of environment she makes her decisions in. This thesis contains studies in which decision environments have potential negative effects on the decision-maker’s welfare. We believe that if the decision maker were to be made aware of the type of effect the environment had on her decision, she would seek to restrict her environment, in other words the way information is transmitted to her.&lt;br /&gt;&lt;br /&gt;More generally, the thesis looks at different types of control. All studies have to do with control, whether it be internal control, such as dealing with one’s own temptations, or external control, such as an irrational aversion to ceding another person control over your own payoff (for example, allowsing someone else to be in the driver seat despite equal abilities, or an unwillingness to let a computer determine one’s own lotto ticket numbers). It looks at human decision making through the lens of dual processing models, specifically the interplay between an impulsive, fast, and biased decision-making system; and a slow, deliberative, rational one (2004). Much behavioral research is pointing to the importance of understanding these two motivations in everything from exercise patterns to reciprocity in social interactions (DellaVigna &amp; Malmendier (2006), Knoch, et al., (2006)).&lt;br /&gt;&lt;br /&gt;This thesis is divided into four chapters. The first three chapters concern behavioral biases and inconsistencies brought to light by psychologists and behavioral scientists. The fourth chapter concerns the processing of conflicting motivation in social decision making. The first two chapters concern intertemporal decision making. Chapters 1, 2, and 4 are joint work with Urs Fischbacher.&lt;br /&gt;&lt;br /&gt;Chapter 1 (Projection Bias: The Price for Food Craving) is about biases in how people predict their future preferences. Most decisions people make involve consequences for the future, and as a result the decision maker must make an estimate about what her preferences will be at that time. Of course these predictions are just that, an estimate, and are subject to error. They are also subject to biases. Projection bias (Loewenstein, O'Donoghue, &amp; Rabin, 2003) is the tendency for predictions about preferences in a different “state” from the one at the moment of deciding are biased toward the one a person is in at the moment of deciding. For instance, Read &amp; van Leeuwen (1998) show that people who are hungry when making a decision are more likely to choose an unhealthy snack to be received at a future date than people who are not hungry when making the decision. Indeed, if a person expects to be hungry in the future it makes sense to pick the more calorie rich food item, and people do. However, current levels of hunger should have no effect, but there is a large impact. Of those who are hungry when making their decision, 78% (56%) choose the unhealthy snack when they predict they will be hungry (satiated) at the time of receipt, whereas for those who are satiated when decided, only 42% (26%) choose the unhealthy, calorie-rich snack.&lt;br /&gt;&lt;br /&gt;Our study also deals with projection bias under hungry and sated states. We use an exogenous and randomly assigned treatment variable to manipulate hunger levels of our subjects, whereas past studies have not. In our experiment, subjects participate in a Vickrey auction for high quality chocolates to be received on a later day, in which it is optimal for a subject to bid her true willingness to pay for a good. We are therefore not only able to show the existence of projection bias, we also show its effect on willingness to pay for products. Projection bias in the marketplace affects consumption decisions, and therefore lifetime patterns of consumption, saving, and overall well-being. It is also a potential source of gain for firms, and for these reasons understanding how projection bias translates into willingness to pay is important. We show that hungry subjects are willing to pay 58% higher prices for a small box of chocolates than sated subjects.&lt;br /&gt;&lt;br /&gt;Chapter 2 (Battling Impulses: Intertemporal Choice in the Short Term) contains three experiments about self-control. Many studies look at impatience by giving subjects a series of decisions between an early, small payoff and a later, larger payoff (delay discounting tasks). These types of studies generally go further to estimate the implied discount rates of subjects’ decisions. Most studies (with a few exceptions) use monetary rewards as a payoff medium, and time spans of the tradeoffs are quite large, on the order of months or years. Using monetary rewards to study time preferences involves problems, mainly because money is not a primary reward; rather it is an opportunity set from which people can obtain a real reward. We are interested in this study in very short term impatience. Indeed, we think that short term impatience is very important to understand, as most temptation occurs when the prospect of a reward is imminent. This makes the use of monetary rewards even less appropriate for our study. We therefore introduce the paradigm of computer games as a medium of reward. Past studies have used food; we viewed this as problematic as we expect it to violate the “more is not worse” concept. We chose our computer game to be tempting and enjoyable, and contrasted it with an annoying task. We did this, so that even if subjects did not want expressly to play the game (which they were not forced to play), they would still desire to avoid the annoying task. Our treatment variable is intended to manipulate the degree to which impulsive motivations are given priority. In the less impulse-friendly environment, subjects make decisions regarding the game before they start the experiment, so before they are actually involved in the game or the task. In the more impulsive environment, they make their decisions while doing the game or task.&lt;br /&gt;&lt;br /&gt;We link behavior in our “temptation tasks” to scores on the Barratt Impulsiveness Scale (BIS), and in experiment 3 of the series we show that behavior is additionally linked to the delay discounting task, using Amazon.de gift certificates as a reward medium. We find that scores on the BIS have more predictive power in the impulsive condition. Furthermore, we find with the delay discounting task that subjects are “present-oriented”; that is have declining discount rates.&lt;br /&gt;&lt;br /&gt;Chapter 3 (Handing Over the Reins: On the Social Nature of the Illusion of Control) concerns the “Illusion of Control” brought to light by Ellen Langer (1975). The illusion of control appears in decisions involving risk. Risky decisions in real life not only involve risk preferences, but also skill. For example, skiing is a risky activity, but the more skill a person has, the lower the probability of an accident (holding choice of slope difficulty constant). In this situation, the amount of risk a person takes depends in part on her assessment of her own skill level. Ellen Langer argues that people conflate the skill with the risk elements, and even when they are given control over elements of a task that have no influence on the risk involved, act as if they have been given (partial) control over the lottery. This leads people to potentially take more risk in situations in which they have a feeling of control.&lt;br /&gt;&lt;br /&gt;Recent work by economists has challenged this notion, and found conflicting results over whether the bias exists. Past studies have generally compared giving illusory control to the decision maker versus giving it to another person. In this paper, I put forth the proposition that this comparison may lead to many different conclusions about whether there is an illusion of control if there is heterogeneity in subjects’ perceptions of their own skill level versus that of another person. I therefore conduct an experiment which makes it possible to observe whether there is heterogeneity in the type of illusion subjects have, and to then categorize them according to this characteristic. I also link their observed illusion of control to scores on the Magical Ideation Scale, which has been shown to be positively related to illusion of control biases (Brugger &amp; Graves, 1997). I find in my study what initially looks like an illusion of control. However, I argue that it is actually the result of randomization. I also observe a link between scores on the Magical Ideation Scale and the amount of variation in individual answers, which I also will argue is the result of randomization, coupled with the unusual distribution of Magical Ideation scores.&lt;br /&gt;Chapter 4 (Social Decision-Making Processes) looks at the processing of different types of conflict in social decision making through observing reaction times. We look at ego conflict (conflict between selfish and social motives) and social conflict (conflict between different social motivating factors). We use traditional (1st party) dictator games, where a decision maker decides over distributions of money for herself and another person, as well as 3rd party dictator games in which a decision maker decides over distributions for two other people with no consequences for her own payoff. We record reaction times as a way of measuring the conflict in a decision and as a way to assess the automaticity or controlled nature of selfish and social motivations. Rubinstein (2007) showed that reaction times could be used as a measurement of conflict when making a decision, and that lower conflict results in quick responses and higher conflict in faster responses. Additionally, automatic processes are thought to be fast and cheap, whereas controlled ones are slow and expensive; therefore we will be able to use reaction times to examine this idea. In our context, the 1st party decisions contain more conflict than the 3rd party conditions, simply because they contain a selfish motivation. With the 3rd party condition, we can assess the individual’s personal norm; that is her attitude about what is a fair way to allocate between two people independent of any selfish motivation. Past studies have shown that selfish decisions are made more quickly than decisions in favor of another person. We introduce the 3rd party condition to assess whether it is the selfish aspect of the decision that results in faster reaction times for selfish decisions, or another, previously undetected property of the decision.&lt;br /&gt;&lt;br /&gt;We find that an increase in social conflict (that is, conflict between social motivating factors) results in increased reaction times. We further found that though selfish decisions are made faster, this is not the result of selfish motivation, but of other aspects of the decision. We also find that the personal norm is not well characterized according to our three identified types of social motivation (efficiency, maximin preferences, and absolute inequality aversion). The personal norm predicts increases in reaction times better than ego conflict with any particular social property, showing that the personal norm captures individual heterogeneity in values.</dcterms:abstract>
    <dc:contributor>Bendrick, Katharine</dc:contributor>
    <dcterms:rights rdf:resource="https://rightsstatements.org/page/InC/1.0/"/>
    <bibo:uri rdf:resource="http://kops.uni-konstanz.de/handle/123456789/20838"/>
    <dc:date rdf:datatype="http://www.w3.org/2001/XMLSchema#dateTime">2012-11-12T10:30:20Z</dc:date>
    <dcterms:title>Economic Experiments on Impulsive Urges, Control, and Irrationality</dcterms:title>
    <dcterms:isPartOf rdf:resource="https://kops.uni-konstanz.de/server/rdf/resource/123456789/46"/>
    <dcterms:available rdf:datatype="http://www.w3.org/2001/XMLSchema#dateTime">2012-11-12T10:30:20Z</dcterms:available>
    <void:sparqlEndpoint rdf:resource="http://localhost/fuseki/dspace/sparql"/>
    <dc:creator>Bendrick, Katharine</dc:creator>
    <dcterms:hasPart rdf:resource="https://kops.uni-konstanz.de/bitstream/123456789/20838/1/Diss_Bendrick.pdf"/>
    <dspace:isPartOfCollection rdf:resource="https://kops.uni-konstanz.de/server/rdf/resource/123456789/46"/>
    <foaf:homepage rdf:resource="http://localhost:8080/"/>
    <dcterms:issued>2012</dcterms:issued>
    <dc:rights>terms-of-use</dc:rights>
    <dc:language>eng</dc:language>
    <dspace:hasBitstream rdf:resource="https://kops.uni-konstanz.de/bitstream/123456789/20838/1/Diss_Bendrick.pdf"/>
  </rdf:Description>
</rdf:RDF>
Interner Vermerk
xmlui.Submission.submit.DescribeStep.inputForms.label.kops_note_fromSubmitter
Kontakt
URL der Originalveröffentl.
Prüfdatum der URL
Prüfungsdatum der Dissertation
October 31, 2012
Finanzierungsart
Kommentar zur Publikation
Allianzlizenz
Corresponding Authors der Uni Konstanz vorhanden
Internationale Co-Autor:innen
Universitätsbibliographie
Begutachtet
Diese Publikation teilen