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Central European plant species from more productive habitats are more invasive at a global scale

Central European plant species from more productive habitats are more invasive at a global scale

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DOSTAL, Petr, Wayne DAWSON, Mark VAN KLEUNEN, Lidewij H. KESER, Markus FISCHER, 2013. Central European plant species from more productive habitats are more invasive at a global scale. In: Global Ecology and Biogeography. 22(1), pp. 64-72. ISSN 1466-822X. eISSN 1466-8238

@article{Dostal2013Centr-19500, title={Central European plant species from more productive habitats are more invasive at a global scale}, year={2013}, doi={10.1111/j.1466-8238.2011.00754.x}, number={1}, volume={22}, issn={1466-822X}, journal={Global Ecology and Biogeography}, pages={64--72}, author={Dostal, Petr and Dawson, Wayne and van Kleunen, Mark and Keser, Lidewij H. and Fischer, Markus} }

Fischer, Markus Keser, Lidewij H. Global Ecology and Biogeography ; 22 (2013), 1. - S. 64-72 Fischer, Markus Dostal, Petr deposit-license Dostal, Petr van Kleunen, Mark Central European plant species from more productive habitats are more invasive at a global scale Dawson, Wayne Keser, Lidewij H. 2013 van Kleunen, Mark Aim: Accumulating evidence indicates that species may be pre-adapted for invasion<br />success in new ranges. In the light of increasing global nutrient accumulation,<br />an important candidate pre-adaptation for invasiveness is the ability to grow in<br />nutrient-rich habitats. Therefore we tested whether globally invasive species originating from Central Europe have come from more productive rather than less<br />productive habitats. A further important candidate pre-adaptation for invasiveness<br />is large niche width. Therefore, we also tested whether species able to grow across<br />habitats with a wider range of productivity are more invasive.<br /><br /><br />Location: Global with respect to invasiveness, and Central European with respect to origin of study species.<br /><br /><br />Methods: We examined whether average habitat productivity and its width across<br />habitats are significant predictors of the success of Central European species as<br />aliens and as weeds elsewhere in the world based on data in the Global Compendium of Weeds. The two habitat productivity measures were derived from nutrient indicator values (after Ellenberg) of accompanying species present in vegetation records of the comprehensive Czech National Phytosociological Database. In the<br />analyses, we accounted for phylogenetic relatedness among species and for size of<br />the native distribution ranges.<br /><br /><br />Results: Species from more productive habitats and with a wider native habitatproductivity niche in Central Europe have higher alien success elsewhere in the world.Weediness of species increased with mean habitat productivity. Niche width was also an important determinant of weediness for species with their main occurrence<br />in nutrient-poor habitats, but not for those from nutrient-rich habitats.<br /><br /><br />Main conclusions: Our results indicate that Central European plant species from<br />productive habitats and those species from nutrient-poor habitat with wide<br />productivity-niche are pre-adapted to become invasive. These results suggest that the world-wide invasion success of many Central European species is likely to have been promoted by the global increase of resource-rich habitats. 2014-02-14T23:25:05Z eng 2012-12-12T12:31:18Z Dawson, Wayne

Dateiabrufe seit 01.10.2014 (Informationen über die Zugriffsstatistik)

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