Characterisation of Local Interneurons in the Antennal Lobe of the Honeybee

Lade...
Vorschaubild
Dateien
DissMeyerA.pdf
DissMeyerA.pdfGröße: 33.15 MBDownloads: 207
Datum
2011
Autor:innen
Herausgeber:innen
Kontakt
ISSN der Zeitschrift
Electronic ISSN
ISBN
Bibliografische Daten
Verlag
Schriftenreihe
Auflagebezeichnung
DOI (zitierfähiger Link)
ArXiv-ID
Internationale Patentnummer
Angaben zur Forschungsförderung
Projekt
Open Access-Veröffentlichung
Open Access Green
Sammlungen
Core Facility der Universität Konstanz
Gesperrt bis
Titel in einer weiteren Sprache
Charakterisierung von lokalen Interneuronen im Antennallobus der Honigbiene
Forschungsvorhaben
Organisationseinheiten
Zeitschriftenheft
Publikationstyp
Dissertation
Publikationsstatus
Published
Erschienen in
Zusammenfassung

The antennal lobe (AL) is the primary olfacory center of the honey bee. It is the site of
interaction between olfactory receptor neurons, and two types of AL neurons: local interneurons (LNs) that are restrained to the AL, and projection neurons (PNs) that relay output to higher processing areas. The present work investigates physiological and morphological properties of honey bee AL neurons, LNs in particular. The individual studies, summarized here, are united by the underlying attempt to infer potentially functional LN sub-populations from the described characteristics.


My first objective was to investigate how individual AL neurons encode a type of complex
information content, the olfactory system is challenged with every day: an odour mixture
(Chapter 2). I stimulated with mono-molecular odorants, their temporally perfect-,and imperfect binary mixture to reproduce a natural dynamic odour environment. Single cell's responses were recorded intracellularly.
Response patterns between di erent neurons varied in many details but were generally speaking either rate changes to excitation or inhibition, respectively, or membrane depolarisation accompanied by one or a few single spikes (cf.: 2.4.2).
Irrespective of its individual response pattern, each neuron, challenged with the binary mixtures, responded in one of two possible ways: elemental, or con gural. About half of the neurons responded elementally, i.e. responses evoked by mixtures re ected the underlying feature information from one of the components. The other half exhibited con gural responses, i.e. responses evoked by mixtures represented these as clearly di erent from their single components (cf.: 2.4.3).
A question immediately arising is, whether these two types of encoding could be associated
with di erent sub-populations of neurons. Referring to the neuron's latencies as an indicator of position within the circuitry, I found that elemental neurons divided in earl responders and late responders whereas latencies of con gural coding neurons concentrate in between these divisions (cf.: 2.4.4). From this nding one may infer that elemental odour coding is not con ned to only one sub-population of neurons. In fact, it is more likely that LNs and PNs, which have previously been shown to di er signi cantly in latency, can both exhibit elemental coding (cf.: 2.5.2). Latencies of neurons with con gural responses expressed a tendency to
respond faster to single components than to imperfect mixtures. This nding made me think
that these neurons may participate in multiple processing circuits. < br />
Both of the above assumptions were con rmed by exemplary morphological data (cf.: 2.4.5).
For each of the two groups of 'elemental neurons', early and late responders, I could obtain an exemplary staining. The early responding neuron was con rmed as an LN, while the late responding neuron was a PN. More surprisingly, however, I found that one of the 'con gural neurons' was a hetero LN, just like the short latency elemental neuron. By comparing the inter-glomerular innervation patterns of the two hetero LNs with odour-speci c glomerular
activation maps, derived from calcium imaging, I hoped to nd an explanation for the difference in odour coding. Indeed, the elemental hetero LN innervated one of the responsive glomeruli densely. The con gural hetero LN, in contrast, innervated glomeruli that were responsive to the chosen stimuli only sparsely. Based on the combined morphological and physiological evidence, I propose to consider hetero LNs as multi-function neurons. Multifunction
neuron here means, the possibility to be recruited by di erent circuits such that
elemental as well as con gural odour-processing are performed by the individual neuron in a stimulus-context dependent manner (cf.: 2.5.3).


The proposed multi-function hetero LN would require the ability to receive sensory input
and give output in both, sparsely and densely branching arbours. Are these requirements
met on the local scale of individual intra-glomerular arborisation? And judging by the global inter-glomerular innervation, in how far are LNs generally tailored to receive and redistribute direct sensory input? Or are innervation patterns rather oriented towards PNs? These are questions I hoped to answer by analysis of LN morphologies under functional aspects (Chapter 3).

I reconstructed morphologies of single neurons from stainings of different LNs. Neuron reconstructions were transformed to fit into a common reference frame. By this means, it got
possible to evaluate which of the four sensory tracts (afferent fi elds) and which of the two
AL hemilobes (efferent fi eld) received innervations. To analyse intra-glomerular arborisation, I reconstructed cap, and where possible core of single glomeruli as well as sparse or dense arborisations of the LNs innervating them.

The inter-glomerular innervation pattern of LNs differed widely on an individual scale, but
appeared to correlate with the division of afferent fields rather than efferent fields (cf.: 3.3.1).

This observation suggests that at least a considerable sub-population of LNs is tailored to collect and integrate meaningfully related ORN input (cf.: 3.4.1). Investigating intra-glomerular arborisation I found markedly different branching patterns for sparse as well as dense arbours. All of these had the potential to establish contact with sensory neurons in the glomerular cap as well as PNs and other LNs in the core (cf.: 3.3.2). On these grounds, morphological requirements for a multi-functional hetero LN are ful lled.
Having come so far it seems that LNs express a certain functional communality. Still, differences in local and global branching patterns, amongst other characteristics, are obvious. Continuing from a perspective of functional morphology, I assembled a toolbox of morphological descriptors based on which I di erentiate six LN-phenotypes (cf.: 3.3.4). Clearly, under the objective of finding functional LN sub-populations the convenient division in only two broad groups of homo- and hetero LNs has to be reconsidered (cf.: 3.4.2).


Systematic differences in morphology, like those based on which I had distinguished six
different LN Phenotypes, are indicators for functional differences between neurons. But, as
the function of a neuron is inevitably the result of all its properties, the same is true for measures of differences in physiology.
Classifi cation based on spiking properties of single neurons has decidedly facilitated the investigation of inter-neurons in the mammalian neocortex. I wondered whether the activity patterns observed in the honey bee, by me and others, could likewise be separated in conclusive groups (Chapter 4).

To approach this question I analysed single cell recordings from a set of AL neurons which
included different LNs, PNs and morphologically unidenti ed neurons. Collected descriptive values of spiking and sub-threshold activity that could be extracted from odour-evoked responses were decorrelated and reduced by means of PCA and subsequently clustered by means of an automated hierarchical algorithm.

Referring back to the original descriptive values, some of the suggested groups were immediately conclusive whereas others appeared more heterogeneous (cf.: 4.3.1). Repeating the
clustering on PCs derived from spiking activity only, the allocation of neurons within clusters was largely preserved while the inter-relationship between groups changed (cf.: 4.3.2).

On this ground I conclude that electro-physiological classifi cation of honey bee AL-neurons is feasible and that the information contained in spiking activity alone is su cient for this purpose (cf.: 4.4.1).

If it is possible to classify groups of AL neurons according to their discharge patterns, could the classi cation criteria be used to predict neuron morphology? Examining the distribution of morphological identi ed LNs, mPNs and lPNs between the suggested groups, I had to conclude that, there is no simple one-to-one relationship between electro-physiological pro les and neuron morphology (cf.: 4.3.3/4.3.1). Still, trends are present in that discharge patterns seem to be typically associated with mPNs and others are strongly suggested to be correlated
with LNs (cf.: 4.4.2). As a whole, LNs and PNs are better distinguished based of spiking
activity alone (cf.: 4.3.3).

Zusammenfassung in einer weiteren Sprache

Der Antennallobus (AL) ist das primäre Hirnareal für Geruchsverarbeitung der Honigbiene. Hier treffen drei Neuronentypen mit grundlegend unterschiedlichen Aufgaben aufeinander:
Die olfaktorischen Rezeptorneurone (ORN) liefern Informationen über die Düfte der Umgebung.
Die lokalen Interneurone (LN) verschalten Regionen innerhalb des AL miteinander. Die
Projektionsneurone (PN) schließlich senden die im AL aufgearbeitete Duftinformationen an
weiterführende Verarbeitungsareale. LNs und PNs zusammen werden auch als AL-Neuronen
bezeichnet. In der vorliegenden Arbeit habe ich physiologische und morphologische Eigenschaften von AL-Neuronen, insbesondere der LNs, untersucht. Allen hier Zusammengefassten Studien liegt als gemeinsamer Gedanke zu Grunde, die beschriebenen Charakteristika zu
nutzen um potentiell funktionelle Subpopulationen von LNs zu identifizieren.


Mein erstes Interesse galt der Frage, wie individuelle AL-Neurone die komplexe Information kodieren, die in einer Duftmischung enthalten ist (Kapitel 2). Um die Verhältnisse in
einem natürlichen, und damit dynamischen Geruchsumfeldes nach zu empfi nden, habe ich
zwei mono-molekulare Düfte, so wie deren zeitlich perfekte und imperfekte Mischungen als
Stimuli verwendet. Die Duftantworten der einzelnen Neurone wurden mittels intrazellulärer Ableitungen gemessen.
Antwortmuster unterschieden sich zwischen den einzelnen Neuronen in vielen Aspekten, konnten
aber grob verallgemeinert als entweder erregte, bzw. unterdrückte Veränderungen der
Feuerrate, oder Depolarisation der Membran begleitet von vereinzelten Aktionspotentialen
beschrieben werden (vgl.: 2.4.2).

Unabhängig vom Antwortmuster, reagierte jedes Neuron auf Stimulation mit binärere Duftmischung in einer von zwei möglichen Weisen: elementar oder konfi gural. Ungefähr die Hälfte der abgeleiteten Zellen kodierte Duftmischungen elementar, dass heißt die Antwort spiegelte Informationen über eine der zu Grunde liegenden Einzelkomponenten wieder. Die andere Hälfte kodierte die Duftmischungen kon figural, dass heißt Antworten auf Duftmischungen waren deutlich unterschiedlich von denen der Einzelkomponenten (vgl.: 2.4.3).
Eine Frage die sich bei dieser Beobachtung fast automatisch stellt ist, ob diese Beiden unterschiedlichen Weisen der Kodierung von zwei Subpopulationen von Neuronen herrühren.
Bei der Betrachtung der Latenzzeiten, die Rückschlüsse auf die Position des jeweiligen Neurons im Verarbeitungskreislauf zulassen, zeigte sich, dass elementar kodierende Neurone in jeweils eine früh- und eine spät-antwortende Untergruppen zerfallen. Die Latenzen der konfigural kodierenden Neurone fi elen genau zwischen diese zwei Gruppen (vgl.: 2.4.4). Dieser Befund gibt Anlass anzunehmen, dass elementare Kodierung nicht einem einzelnen Typ Neuronzuzuweisen ist. Tatsächlich ist es wahrscheinlicher, dass sowohl Neurone vom Typ der LNs als auch solche vom Typ der PNs, die sich deutlich in ihren Latenzzeiten unterscheiden, elementare Duftantworten zeigen (vgl.: 2.5.2). Für die kon figural kodierenden Neurone war eine solche Zweiteilung er Latenzen nicht zu sehen. Hier war jedoch ein anderer Trend
erkenntlich, nämlich der, schneller auf Einzelkomponenten als auf imperfekte Mischungen zu antworten. Diese Beobachtung deutete ich als Hinweis auf eine mögliche Einbindung diese Neuron in mehrere, parallele Verarbeitungswege.

Die Annahmen, die ich gegenüber beiden Gruppen, kon figuralen und elementar kodierenden Neuronen, gemacht hatte, wurden bestärkt durch exemplarische Färbungen abgeleiteter Neurone (vgl.: 2.4.5). Für jede der zwei elementaren Untergruppen, konnte jeweils eine Färbung erhalten werden. Das früh-antwortende Neuron war in der Tat ein LN, das spät-antwortende ein PN. Überraschender hingegen war die Entdeckung, das ein erfolgreich gefärbtes konfigural kodierendes Neuron, zur gleichen morphologischen Gruppe gehörte, wie das früh-antwortende elementare Neuron, zu den hetero-LNs. Wie kam es dazu das morphologisch ähnliche Neurone Mischungen so unterschiedlich kodieren? Ich hoffte eine Erklärung zu fi nden, in dem ich die inter-glomerulären Innervationsmuster der individuellen Neurone mit den duftspezi schen glomerulären Aktivitätsmustern, wie sie durch Kalziumbildgebung bekannt sind, verglich.
Anhand dieses Vergleiches konnte ich feststellen, dass des elementar antwortende hetero-LN einen der auf den Stimulus ansprechenden Glomeruli stark innervierte. Das Neuron, das die Duftmischung kon figural beantwortet hatte, innervierte hingegen Glomeruli die auf den Duft ansprechen nur schwach. Auf Grund der kombinierten physiologischen und morphologischen
Befunde gehe ich davon aus, dass hetero-LNs als multi-funktions Neurone betrachtet
werden können. Multi-funktionalität entspricht in diesem Fall der Möglichkeit in über unterschiedliche Verarbeitungspfade angesprochen zu werden, wodurch elementare und kon gurale Kodierung in Abhängigkeit vom Stimuluskontext durch das gleiche Neuron geleistet werden können (vgl.: 2.5.3).


Ein solches multi-funktionales hetero LN setzt voraus, dass sensorischer Eingang aus stark
innervierten, aber auch aus schwach innervierten Glomeruli erhälten wird. Ist diese Voraussetzung auf der lokalen Ebene von individueller intra-glomerulärer Verästelung erfüllt? Und, in Hinblick auf die globale, inter-glomeruläre Verzweigung, wäre LN-Morphologie auf die Aufgabe
zugeschnitten, sensorische Information zu empfangen und um zu verteilen? Oder sind
die Verzweigungsmuster eher mit Rücksicht auf PN gegebene Strukturen orientiert? (Kapitel
3).

Ausgehend von Einzelzellfärbungen, rekonstruierte ich die Morphologie unterschiedlicher LN. Die rekonstruierten Neurone wurden durch Transformation in einen gemeinsamen Bezugs-AL, gesetzt. Anhand dieses Bezug-ALs war es nun möglich abzuschätzen, welche der vier sensorischen Trakte (afferente Felder) und welche der zwei AL Hemiloben (efferente Felder) vom individuellen Neuron innerviert wurden. Um die intra-glomeruläre Verästelung zu untersuchen rekonstruierte ich zusätzlich zu den Neuriten der LNs, die Kappe und wo möglich auch den Kern des innervierten Glomerulus selber.
Das Muster der inter-glomerulären Verzweigungen war zwischen LNs sehr unterschiedlich, korrelierte aber besser mit der Unterteilung der afferenten Felder als mit der der efferenten Felder (vgl.: 3.3.1). Folglich kann davon ausgegangen werden, das zumindest ein beträchtlicher Anteil an LNs dafür ausgelegt ist, Informationen von ORNs zu empfangen und zwischen ihnen zu integrieren (vgl.: 3.4.1). Bei Betrachtung der intra-glomerulären Verästelungen, stellte ich fest, das stark verzweigte, wie auch schwach verzweigte Neurite in systematische Untergruppen differenziert werden konnten. Jedes dieser Verästelungsmuster zeigte räumliche Überlappung mit der Kappe und dem Kern des Glomerulus (vgl.: 3.3.2).

Offensichtlich teilen LNs gewisse gemeinschaftliche, funktionelle Eigenschaften. Nichts desto trotz sind sie in vielerlei Hinsicht deutlich voneinander unterschiedlich. Weiterhin ausgehend von einem funktionellen Blickwinkel auf morphologische Charakteristika, de finierte ich eine Anzahl von systematisch unterscheidbaren Eigenschaften, anhand derer sich sechs LNPhenotypen ergaben (vgl.: 3.3.4). Damit wird deutlich, dass die Einteilung von LNs in nur zwei Subpopulationen, nämlich hetero und homo LNs überdacht werden muss (vgl.: 3.4.2).


Systematische morphologische Unterschiede sind Hinweise darauf, das die betreffenden
Neurone möglicherweise unterschiedliche Funktinen erfüllen. Da die Funktion eines Neurons aber unbestritten das Ergebnis des Zusammenspiels aller seiner Eigenschaften ist, gilt das Selbe für physiologische Unterschiede. So hat die Klassi zierung von Einzelzellen aufgrund ihres Feuerprofi ls die Erforschung von etwa neokortikalen Interneuronen entschieden vorangetrieben. Inspiriert durch Arbeiten im Neokortex, wollte ich wissen, ob die unterschiedlichen Antwortmuster, die im AL der Honigbiene beobachtet werden, in ähnlicherWeise
aussagekräftig Unterteilt werden können (Kapitel 4).

Ich verfolgte diesen Ansatz, indem ich Einzellzellableitungen von unterschiedlichen LNs, PNs sowie morphologisch nicht identi fizierter Neurone analysierte. Deskriptive Werte des Feuerverhaltens, aber auch für Veränderungen des Membranpotentials, wurden aus Aufnahmen von duftevozierter Aktivität erhoben und anschlieÿend mit Hilfe von PCA dekorreliert und reduziert. Die so transformierten Werte wurden unter Verwendung eines hierarchischen Clusteralgorythmus in Ähnlichkeitsgruppen eingeteilt. Wurden die so erhaltenen Gruppen von Neuronen anhand der ursprünglichen Deskriptoren charakterisiert, zeigte sich das einige der Gruppen fast stereotype Gemeinsamkeiten aufweisen, während andere deutlich heterogener sind (vgl.: 4.3.1). Wurde das Clustering auf Hauptkomponenten die ausschließlich Deskriptoren von Feuerverhalten berücksichtigten wiederholt, veränderte sich die Zuteilung von Neuronen innerhalb einer Gruppe kaum. Die Verwandtschaftsbeziehungen zwischen Gruppen hingegen waren verändert (vgl.: 4.3.2). Anhand dieses Ergebnisses wird deutlich, dass es möglich ist AL-Neurone der Honigbiene anhand ihrer Elektrophysiologie zu klassifi zieren und das zu diesem Zweck die im Feuerverhalten enthaltene Information hinreichend ist (vgl.: 4.4.1).

Wenn es möglich ist AL-Neurone anhand ihrer Aktivitätsmuster zu unterscheiden, können
die entsprechenden Unterscheidungskriterien genutzt werden um eine Vorhersage über die
Morphologie des Neurons zu machen? Betrachtet man zu diesem Zweck die Verteilung
von morphologische identi zierten LNs, mPNs und lPNs zwischen den elektrophysiologischen
Gruppierungen, muss festgestellt werden, dass eine eindeutige Zuweisung nicht möglich
ist (vgl.: 4.3.3/4.3.1). Nichts desto trotz sind deutliche Trends zu erkennen. So sind einige Feuermuster typischerweise mit mPNs verknüpft, während andere aller Wahrscheinlichkeit nach von LNs stammen (vgl.: 4.4.2). Im Großen und Ganzen, sind PNs besser von LNs auf der Grundlage ihrer Feuermuster und ohne zusätzliche Beschreibung des Membranpotentials zu unterscheiden (vgl.: 4.3.3).

Fachgebiet (DDC)
570 Biowissenschaften, Biologie
Schlagwörter
Neuroscience, Honeybee, Insect, Antennal Lobe, Interneuron, Electrophysiology, Morphology, Clustering, Olfaction
Konferenz
Rezension
undefined / . - undefined, undefined
Zitieren
ISO 690MEYER, Anneke, 2011. Characterisation of Local Interneurons in the Antennal Lobe of the Honeybee [Dissertation]. Konstanz: University of Konstanz
BibTex
@phdthesis{Meyer2011Chara-16253,
  year={2011},
  title={Characterisation of Local Interneurons in the Antennal Lobe of the Honeybee},
  author={Meyer, Anneke},
  address={Konstanz},
  school={Universität Konstanz}
}
RDF
<rdf:RDF
    xmlns:dcterms="http://purl.org/dc/terms/"
    xmlns:dc="http://purl.org/dc/elements/1.1/"
    xmlns:rdf="http://www.w3.org/1999/02/22-rdf-syntax-ns#"
    xmlns:bibo="http://purl.org/ontology/bibo/"
    xmlns:dspace="http://digital-repositories.org/ontologies/dspace/0.1.0#"
    xmlns:foaf="http://xmlns.com/foaf/0.1/"
    xmlns:void="http://rdfs.org/ns/void#"
    xmlns:xsd="http://www.w3.org/2001/XMLSchema#" > 
  <rdf:Description rdf:about="https://kops.uni-konstanz.de/server/rdf/resource/123456789/16253">
    <dc:date rdf:datatype="http://www.w3.org/2001/XMLSchema#dateTime">2011-11-08T09:42:47Z</dc:date>
    <dcterms:title>Characterisation of Local Interneurons in the Antennal Lobe of the Honeybee</dcterms:title>
    <dc:contributor>Meyer, Anneke</dc:contributor>
    <dspace:isPartOfCollection rdf:resource="https://kops.uni-konstanz.de/server/rdf/resource/123456789/28"/>
    <dc:creator>Meyer, Anneke</dc:creator>
    <dspace:hasBitstream rdf:resource="https://kops.uni-konstanz.de/bitstream/123456789/16253/2/DissMeyerA.pdf"/>
    <dcterms:isPartOf rdf:resource="https://kops.uni-konstanz.de/server/rdf/resource/123456789/28"/>
    <dc:rights>terms-of-use</dc:rights>
    <dcterms:available rdf:datatype="http://www.w3.org/2001/XMLSchema#dateTime">2011-11-08T09:42:47Z</dcterms:available>
    <dcterms:issued>2011</dcterms:issued>
    <dcterms:rights rdf:resource="https://rightsstatements.org/page/InC/1.0/"/>
    <dc:language>eng</dc:language>
    <dcterms:abstract xml:lang="eng">The antennal lobe (AL) is the primary olfacory center of the honey bee. It is the site of&lt;br /&gt;interaction between olfactory receptor neurons, and two types of AL neurons: local interneurons (LNs) that are restrained to the AL, and projection neurons (PNs) that relay output to higher processing areas. The present work investigates physiological and morphological properties of honey bee AL neurons, LNs in particular. The individual studies, summarized here, are united by the underlying attempt to infer potentially functional LN sub-populations from the described characteristics.&lt;br /&gt;&lt;br /&gt;&lt;br /&gt;My  first objective was to investigate how individual AL neurons encode a type of complex&lt;br /&gt;information content, the olfactory system is challenged with every day: an odour mixture&lt;br /&gt;(Chapter 2). I stimulated with mono-molecular odorants, their temporally perfect-,and imperfect binary mixture to reproduce a natural dynamic odour environment. Single cell's responses were recorded intracellularly.&lt;br /&gt;Response patterns between di erent neurons varied in many details but were generally speaking either rate changes to excitation or inhibition, respectively, or membrane depolarisation accompanied by one or a few single spikes (cf.: 2.4.2).&lt;br /&gt;Irrespective of its individual response pattern, each neuron, challenged with the binary mixtures, responded in one of two possible ways: elemental, or con gural. About half of the neurons responded elementally, i.e. responses evoked by mixtures re ected the underlying feature information from one of the components. The other half exhibited con gural responses, i.e. responses evoked by mixtures represented these as clearly di erent from their single components (cf.: 2.4.3).&lt;br /&gt;A question immediately arising is, whether these two types of encoding could be associated&lt;br /&gt;with di erent sub-populations of neurons. Referring to the neuron's latencies as an indicator of position within the circuitry, I found that elemental neurons divided in earl responders and late responders whereas latencies of con gural coding neurons concentrate in between these divisions (cf.: 2.4.4). From this  nding one may infer that elemental odour coding is not con ned to only one sub-population of neurons. In fact, it is more likely that LNs and PNs, which have previously been shown to di er signi cantly in latency, can both exhibit elemental coding (cf.: 2.5.2). Latencies of neurons with con gural responses expressed a tendency to&lt;br /&gt;respond faster to single components than to imperfect mixtures. This  nding made me think&lt;br /&gt;that these neurons may participate in multiple processing circuits. &lt; br /&gt;&lt;br /&gt;Both of the above assumptions were con rmed by exemplary morphological data (cf.: 2.4.5).&lt;br /&gt;For each of the two groups of 'elemental neurons', early and late responders, I could obtain an exemplary staining. The early responding neuron was con rmed as an LN, while the late responding neuron was a PN. More surprisingly, however, I found that one of the 'con gural neurons' was a hetero LN, just like the short latency elemental neuron. By comparing the inter-glomerular innervation patterns of the two hetero LNs with odour-speci c glomerular&lt;br /&gt;activation maps, derived from calcium imaging, I hoped to  nd an explanation for the difference in odour coding. Indeed, the elemental hetero LN innervated one of the responsive glomeruli densely. The con gural hetero LN, in contrast, innervated glomeruli that were responsive to the chosen stimuli only sparsely. Based on the combined morphological and physiological evidence, I propose to consider hetero LNs as multi-function neurons. Multifunction&lt;br /&gt;neuron here means, the possibility to be recruited by di erent circuits such that&lt;br /&gt;elemental as well as con gural odour-processing are performed by the individual neuron in a stimulus-context dependent manner (cf.: 2.5.3).&lt;br /&gt;&lt;br /&gt;&lt;br /&gt;The proposed multi-function hetero LN would require the ability to receive sensory input&lt;br /&gt;and give output in both, sparsely and densely branching arbours. Are these requirements&lt;br /&gt;met on the local scale of individual intra-glomerular arborisation? And judging by the global inter-glomerular innervation, in how far are LNs generally tailored to receive and redistribute direct sensory input? Or are innervation patterns rather oriented towards PNs? These are questions I hoped to answer by analysis of LN morphologies under functional aspects (Chapter 3).&lt;br /&gt;&lt;br /&gt;I reconstructed morphologies of single neurons from stainings of different LNs. Neuron reconstructions were transformed to  fit into a common reference frame. By this means, it got&lt;br /&gt;possible to evaluate which of the four sensory tracts (afferent fi elds) and which of the two&lt;br /&gt;AL hemilobes (efferent fi eld) received innervations. To analyse intra-glomerular arborisation, I reconstructed cap, and where possible core of single glomeruli as well as sparse or dense arborisations of the LNs innervating them.&lt;br /&gt;&lt;br /&gt;The inter-glomerular innervation pattern of LNs differed widely on an individual scale, but&lt;br /&gt;appeared to correlate with the division of afferent  fields rather than efferent  fields (cf.: 3.3.1).&lt;br /&gt;&lt;br /&gt;This observation suggests that at least a considerable sub-population of LNs is tailored to collect and integrate meaningfully related ORN input (cf.: 3.4.1). Investigating intra-glomerular arborisation I found markedly different branching patterns for sparse as well as dense arbours. All of these had the potential to establish contact with sensory neurons in the glomerular cap as well as PNs and other LNs in the core (cf.: 3.3.2). On these grounds, morphological requirements for a multi-functional hetero LN are ful lled.&lt;br /&gt;Having come so far it seems that LNs express a certain functional communality. Still, differences in local and global branching patterns, amongst other characteristics, are obvious. Continuing from a perspective of functional morphology, I assembled a toolbox of morphological descriptors based on which I di erentiate six LN-phenotypes (cf.: 3.3.4). Clearly, under the objective of  finding functional LN sub-populations the convenient division in only two broad groups of homo- and hetero LNs has to be reconsidered (cf.: 3.4.2).&lt;br /&gt;&lt;br /&gt;&lt;br /&gt;Systematic differences in morphology, like those based on which I had distinguished six&lt;br /&gt;different LN Phenotypes, are indicators for functional differences between neurons. But, as&lt;br /&gt;the function of a neuron is inevitably the result of all its properties, the same is true for measures of differences in physiology.&lt;br /&gt;Classifi cation based on spiking properties of single neurons has decidedly facilitated the investigation of inter-neurons in the mammalian neocortex. I wondered whether the activity patterns observed in the honey bee, by me and others, could likewise be separated in conclusive groups (Chapter 4).&lt;br /&gt;&lt;br /&gt;To approach this question I analysed single cell recordings from a set of AL neurons which&lt;br /&gt;included different LNs, PNs and morphologically unidenti ed neurons. Collected descriptive values of spiking and sub-threshold activity that could be extracted from odour-evoked responses were decorrelated and reduced by means of PCA and subsequently clustered by means of an automated hierarchical algorithm.&lt;br /&gt;&lt;br /&gt;Referring back to the original descriptive values, some of the suggested groups were immediately conclusive whereas others appeared more heterogeneous (cf.: 4.3.1). Repeating the&lt;br /&gt;clustering on PCs derived from spiking activity only, the allocation of neurons within clusters was largely preserved while the inter-relationship between groups changed (cf.: 4.3.2).&lt;br /&gt;&lt;br /&gt;On this ground I conclude that electro-physiological classifi cation of honey bee AL-neurons is feasible and that the information contained in spiking activity alone is su cient for this purpose (cf.: 4.4.1).&lt;br /&gt;&lt;br /&gt;If it is possible to classify groups of AL neurons according to their discharge patterns, could the classi cation criteria be used to predict neuron morphology? Examining the distribution of morphological identi ed LNs, mPNs and lPNs between the suggested groups, I had to conclude that, there is no simple one-to-one relationship between electro-physiological pro les and neuron morphology (cf.: 4.3.3/4.3.1). Still, trends are present in that discharge patterns seem to be typically associated with mPNs and others are strongly suggested to be correlated&lt;br /&gt;with LNs (cf.: 4.4.2). As a whole, LNs and PNs are better distinguished based of spiking&lt;br /&gt;activity alone (cf.: 4.3.3).</dcterms:abstract>
    <dcterms:hasPart rdf:resource="https://kops.uni-konstanz.de/bitstream/123456789/16253/2/DissMeyerA.pdf"/>
    <foaf:homepage rdf:resource="http://localhost:8080/"/>
    <bibo:uri rdf:resource="http://kops.uni-konstanz.de/handle/123456789/16253"/>
    <void:sparqlEndpoint rdf:resource="http://localhost/fuseki/dspace/sparql"/>
    <dcterms:alternative>Charakterisierung von lokalen Interneuronen im Antennallobus der Honigbiene</dcterms:alternative>
  </rdf:Description>
</rdf:RDF>
Interner Vermerk
xmlui.Submission.submit.DescribeStep.inputForms.label.kops_note_fromSubmitter
Kontakt
URL der Originalveröffentl.
Prüfdatum der URL
Prüfungsdatum der Dissertation
May 23, 2011
Finanzierungsart
Kommentar zur Publikation
Allianzlizenz
Corresponding Authors der Uni Konstanz vorhanden
Internationale Co-Autor:innen
Universitätsbibliographie
Begutachtet
Diese Publikation teilen