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Preadapted for invasiveness : do species traits or their plastic response to shading differ between invasive and non-invasive plant species in their native range?

Preadapted for invasiveness : do species traits or their plastic response to shading differ between invasive and non-invasive plant species in their native range?

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VAN KLEUNEN, Mark, Daniel R. SCHLAEPFER, Melanie GLAETTLI, Markus FISCHER, 2011. Preadapted for invasiveness : do species traits or their plastic response to shading differ between invasive and non-invasive plant species in their native range?. In: Journal of Biogeography. 38(7), pp. 1294-1304. ISSN 0305-0270

@article{van Kleunen2011Pread-13922, title={Preadapted for invasiveness : do species traits or their plastic response to shading differ between invasive and non-invasive plant species in their native range?}, year={2011}, doi={10.1111/j.1365-2699.2011.02495.x}, number={7}, volume={38}, issn={0305-0270}, journal={Journal of Biogeography}, pages={1294--1304}, author={van Kleunen, Mark and Schlaepfer, Daniel R. and Glaettli, Melanie and Fischer, Markus} }

Glaettli, Melanie Preadapted for invasiveness : do species traits or their plastic response to shading differ between invasive and non-invasive plant species in their native range? Fischer, Markus Schlaepfer, Daniel R. Aim: Species capable of vigorous growth under a wide range of environmental<br />conditions should have a higher chance of becoming invasive after introduction<br />into new regions. High performance across environments can be achieved either<br />by constitutively expressed traits that allow for high resource uptake under<br />different environmental conditions or by adaptive plasticity of traits. Here we test whether invasive and non-invasive species differ in presumably adaptive<br />plasticity.<br />Location: Europe (for native species); the rest of the world and North America in<br />particular (for alien species).<br />Methods: We selected 14 congeneric pairs of European herbaceous species that<br />have all been introduced elsewhere. One species of each pair is highly invasive<br />elsewhere in the world, particularly so in North America, whereas the other<br />species has not become invasive or has spread only to a limited degree. We grew<br />native plant material of the 28 species under shaded and non-shaded conditions<br />in a common garden experiment, and measured biomass production and<br />morphological traits that are frequently related to shade tolerance and avoidance.<br />Results: Invasive species had higher shoot–root ratios, tended to have longer leafblades, and produced more biomass than congeneric non-invasive species both<br />under shaded and non-shaded conditions. Plants responded to shading by<br />increasing shoot–root ratios and specific leaf area. Surprisingly, these shadeinduced<br />responses, which are widely considered to be adaptive, did not differ between invasive and non-invasive species.<br />Main conclusions: We conclude that high biomass production across different<br />light environments pre-adapts species to become invasive, and that this is not<br />mediated by plasticities of the morphological traits that we measured. eng Fischer, Markus van Kleunen, Mark 2012-07-30T22:25:06Z First publ. in: Journal of Biogeography 38 (2011), 7, pp. 1294–1304 2011 Schlaepfer, Daniel R. van Kleunen, Mark Glaettli, Melanie deposit-license 2011-06-30T09:20:54Z

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