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Experiment meets biogeography: plants of river corridor distribution are not more stress tolerant but benefit less from more benign conditions elsewhere

Experiment meets biogeography: plants of river corridor distribution are not more stress tolerant but benefit less from more benign conditions elsewhere

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FISCHER, Markus, Michael BURKART, Vanessa PASQUALETTO, Mark VAN KLEUNEN, 2010. Experiment meets biogeography: plants of river corridor distribution are not more stress tolerant but benefit less from more benign conditions elsewhere. In: Journal of Plant Ecology. 3(3), pp. 149-155. ISSN 1752-9921. Available under: doi: 10.1093/jpe/rtq013

@article{Fischer2010Exper-12469, title={Experiment meets biogeography: plants of river corridor distribution are not more stress tolerant but benefit less from more benign conditions elsewhere}, year={2010}, doi={10.1093/jpe/rtq013}, number={3}, volume={3}, issn={1752-9921}, journal={Journal of Plant Ecology}, pages={149--155}, author={Fischer, Markus and Burkart, Michael and Pasqualetto, Vanessa and van Kleunen, Mark} }

Burkart, Michael Fischer, Markus 2011-06-27T12:13:13Z van Kleunen, Mark First publ. in: First publ. in: Journal of Plant Ecology 3 (2010), 3, pp. 149-155 Pasqualetto, Vanessa 2011-06-27T12:13:13Z deposit-license van Kleunen, Mark Burkart, Michael Aims: Factors limiting distributions of species are fundamental to ecology<br />and evolution but have rarely been addressed experimentally for<br />multiple species. The conspicuous linear distribution patterns of<br />plant species confined to river corridors in the Central European<br />lowlands constitute an especially long-standing distribution puzzle.<br />We experimentally tested our novel hypothesis that the tolerance of<br />species to river corridor conditions is independent of the degree of<br />confinement to river corridor habitats, but that species not confined<br />to river corridors are better able to take advantage of the more benign<br />non-river corridor conditions.<br />Methods: We grew 42 herbaceous species differing in their confinement to<br />river corridors in a common garden experiment on loamy soil typical<br />for river corridor areas and sandy soil typical for non-river corridor<br />areas, and with and without a flooding period. For a subset of species,<br />we grew plants of both river corridor and non-river corridor origin to<br />test for adaptation to river corridor conditions.<br />Important findings: Species more confined to river corridor areas benefited less from the more benign non-flooded and non-river corridor soil conditions<br />than species of wider distributional range did. For subsets of 7 and<br />12 widespread species, the response to flooding and soil origin, respectively,<br />did not differ between plants from river corridor sites and plants from other sites, suggesting that the habitat tolerance of widespread species is due to phenotypic plasticity rather than<br />to local adaptation. Overall, we found clear support for our novel<br />hypothesis that species not confined to river corridors are more able<br />to take advantage of the more benign non-river corridor conditions.<br />Our study provides a general hypothesis on differences between species<br />confined to stressful habitats and widespread species out for test<br />in further multispecies comparative experiments. Experiment meets biogeography: plants of river corridor distribution are not more stress tolerant but benefit less from more benign conditions elsewhere Pasqualetto, Vanessa 2010 Fischer, Markus eng

Dateiabrufe seit 01.10.2014 (Informationen über die Zugriffsstatistik)

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