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Experiment meets biogeography: plants of river corridor distribution are not more stress tolerant but benefit less from more benign conditions elsewhere

Experiment meets biogeography: plants of river corridor distribution are not more stress tolerant but benefit less from more benign conditions elsewhere

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FISCHER, Markus, Michael BURKART, Vanessa PASQUALETTO, Mark VAN KLEUNEN, 2010. Experiment meets biogeography: plants of river corridor distribution are not more stress tolerant but benefit less from more benign conditions elsewhere. In: Journal of Plant Ecology. 3(3), pp. 149-155. ISSN 1752-9921

@article{Fischer2010Exper-12469, title={Experiment meets biogeography: plants of river corridor distribution are not more stress tolerant but benefit less from more benign conditions elsewhere}, year={2010}, doi={10.1093/jpe/rtq013}, number={3}, volume={3}, issn={1752-9921}, journal={Journal of Plant Ecology}, pages={149--155}, author={Fischer, Markus and Burkart, Michael and Pasqualetto, Vanessa and van Kleunen, Mark} }

Burkart, Michael Fischer, Markus 2011-06-27T12:13:13Z van Kleunen, Mark First publ. in: First publ. in: Journal of Plant Ecology 3 (2010), 3, pp. 149-155 2011-06-27T12:13:13Z Pasqualetto, Vanessa deposit-license van Kleunen, Mark Burkart, Michael Experiment meets biogeography: plants of river corridor distribution are not more stress tolerant but benefit less from more benign conditions elsewhere Aims: Factors limiting distributions of species are fundamental to ecology<br />and evolution but have rarely been addressed experimentally for<br />multiple species. The conspicuous linear distribution patterns of<br />plant species confined to river corridors in the Central European<br />lowlands constitute an especially long-standing distribution puzzle.<br />We experimentally tested our novel hypothesis that the tolerance of<br />species to river corridor conditions is independent of the degree of<br />confinement to river corridor habitats, but that species not confined<br />to river corridors are better able to take advantage of the more benign<br />non-river corridor conditions.<br />Methods: We grew 42 herbaceous species differing in their confinement to<br />river corridors in a common garden experiment on loamy soil typical<br />for river corridor areas and sandy soil typical for non-river corridor<br />areas, and with and without a flooding period. For a subset of species,<br />we grew plants of both river corridor and non-river corridor origin to<br />test for adaptation to river corridor conditions.<br />Important findings: Species more confined to river corridor areas benefited less from the more benign non-flooded and non-river corridor soil conditions<br />than species of wider distributional range did. For subsets of 7 and<br />12 widespread species, the response to flooding and soil origin, respectively,<br />did not differ between plants from river corridor sites and plants from other sites, suggesting that the habitat tolerance of widespread species is due to phenotypic plasticity rather than<br />to local adaptation. Overall, we found clear support for our novel<br />hypothesis that species not confined to river corridors are more able<br />to take advantage of the more benign non-river corridor conditions.<br />Our study provides a general hypothesis on differences between species<br />confined to stressful habitats and widespread species out for test<br />in further multispecies comparative experiments. Pasqualetto, Vanessa 2010 Fischer, Markus eng

Dateiabrufe seit 01.10.2014 (Informationen über die Zugriffsstatistik)

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