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The representation of the verb's argument structure as disclosed by fMRI

The representation of the verb's argument structure as disclosed by fMRI

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ASSADOLLAHI, Ramin, Marcus MEINZER, Tobias FLAISCH, Jonas OBLESER, Brigitte ROCKSTROH, 2009. The representation of the verb's argument structure as disclosed by fMRI. In: BMC Neuroscience. 10, 3. ISSN 1471-2202. Available under: doi: 10.1186/1471-2202-10-3

@article{Assadollahi2009repre-11261, title={The representation of the verb's argument structure as disclosed by fMRI}, year={2009}, doi={10.1186/1471-2202-10-3}, volume={10}, issn={1471-2202}, journal={BMC Neuroscience}, author={Assadollahi, Ramin and Meinzer, Marcus and Flaisch, Tobias and Obleser, Jonas and Rockstroh, Brigitte}, note={Article Number: 3} }

Assadollahi, Ramin application/pdf The representation of the verb's argument structure as disclosed by fMRI Obleser, Jonas Meinzer, Marcus First publ. in: BMC Neuroscience 10 (2009), 3 Background: In the composition of an event the verb s argument structure defines the number of participants and their relationships. Previous studies indicated distinct brain responses depending on how many obligatory arguments a verb takes. The present functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) study served to verify the neural structures involved in the processing of German verbs with one (e.g. snore ) or three (e.g. gives ) argument structure. Within a silent reading design, verbs were presented either in isolation or with a minimal syntactic context ( snore vs. Peter snores ).<br />Results: Reading of isolated oneargument verbs ( snore ) produced stronger BOLD responses than three-argument verbs ( gives ) in the inferior temporal fusiform gyrus (BA 37) of the left hemisphere, validating<br />previous magnetoencephalographic findings. When presented in context one-argument verbs ( Peter snores ) induced more pronounced activity in the inferior frontal gyrus (IFG) of the left hemisphere than three-argument verbs ( Peter gives ). Conclusions: In line with previous studies our results corroborate the left temporal lobe as site of representation and the IFG as<br />site of processing of verbs argument structure. Flaisch, Tobias Flaisch, Tobias eng terms-of-use Rockstroh, Brigitte 2009 Assadollahi, Ramin 2011-03-25T09:27:10Z Obleser, Jonas Meinzer, Marcus Rockstroh, Brigitte 2011-03-25T09:27:10Z

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