KOPS - Das Institutionelle Repositorium der Universität Konstanz

When Thinking It Means Doing It : Prefactual Thought In Self-handicapping Behavior

When Thinking It Means Doing It : Prefactual Thought In Self-handicapping Behavior

Zitieren

Dateien zu dieser Ressource

Prüfsumme: MD5:43eb9a19b0248ba0b13d746df7ddaae1

FLAMM, Aneka, 2006. When Thinking It Means Doing It : Prefactual Thought In Self-handicapping Behavior

@phdthesis{Flamm2006Think-11070, title={When Thinking It Means Doing It : Prefactual Thought In Self-handicapping Behavior}, year={2006}, author={Flamm, Aneka}, address={Konstanz}, school={Universität Konstanz} }

Wenn Denken zu Handeln wird: Präfaktisches Denken im Self-handicapping Flamm, Aneka Flamm, Aneka 2011-03-25T09:25:17Z deposit-license application/pdf 2006 2011-03-25T09:25:17Z eng When Thinking It Means Doing It : Prefactual Thought In Self-handicapping Behavior People exhibit a variety of self-protective behavioral strategies to shield themselves from negative implications about their valued abilities and personality attributes. The present research examined one such self-protective strategy, self-handicapping, focusing on the cognitive processes associated with this behavior.<br />Self-handicapping involves the anticipation of a possible failure and the precautionary creation of obstacles to success (e.g., practice withdrawal or choice of a distracting environment) to use as an excuse if necessary. Self-handicapping evidently necessitates a certain amount of forethought to establish an excuse prior to the performance, for which prefactual thought plays a crucial role in identifying potential handicaps. Four studies investigated the causal role of prefactuals (i.e., thoughts about possible future outcomes) in self-handicapping.<br />It was specifically proposed that individuals who focused on prefactuals identifying ways their performance could be worse (i.e., downward) would subsequently engage in more self-handicapping behavior, compared to those focusing on prefactuals identifying ways their performance could be better (i.e., upward). Findings supported the predictions by indicating that those participants induced to consider downward prefactual thoughts subsequently showed more practice withdrawal and selection of a distracting environment before an important exam than did those induced to consider upward prefactual thoughts.<br />In addition, it was proposed that the effects of prefactual thought resulting in self-handicapping are consequential in that they negatively influence performance. Evidence is provided that partially supports this notion.<br />The present work entails studies conducted both in the laboratory as well as one field study that address these issues. The results are discussed in terms of extensions to work on self-handicapping and its possible underlying mechanisms, as well as prefactual thinking more generally.<br />Lastly, the circumstances under which strategies such as self-handicapping can be triggered are identified, ways of how it can be prevented are suggested, and new perspectives for future research are discussed.

Dateiabrufe seit 01.10.2014 (Informationen über die Zugriffsstatistik)

Flamm_Diss.pdf 463

Das Dokument erscheint in:

KOPS Suche


Stöbern

Mein Benutzerkonto